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Outbreak of Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Baltimore City, Maryland, 1995

Outbreak of Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Baltimore City, Maryland, 1995 Abstract FROM 1993 to 1995, the number of primary and secondary syphilis cases reported in Baltimore City (1990 population: 736,014) increased 97%, from 179 to 352 cases per year. To identify potential reasons for this increase, CDC, in collaboration with the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, analyzed data about primary and secondary syphilis cases during 1992-1995 and about temporal trends in factors that may affect syphilis rates (e.g., partner-notification results, access to medical care, and community illicit-drug use). In addition, data were analyzed from the two public sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in Baltimore City. BCHD collects demographic data for all cases of reported syphilis among patients who reside in Baltimore City and attempts to interview and provide partner notification and treatment for these patients. This report summarizes the results of the analysis, which suggest the outbreak has been associated with decreases References 1. Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Annual medical examiner data, 1994: data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network. Rockville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1995. 2. Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Preliminary estimates from the Drug Abuse Warning Network: 1994 preliminary estimates of drugrelated emergency department episodes. Rockville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1995. (Advance report no. 11). 3. Nakashima AK, Rolfs RT, Flock ML, Kilmarx P, Greenspan JR. Epidemiology of syphilis in the United States, 1941-1993 . Sex Transm Dis 1996; 23:16-23.Crossref 4. Rolfs RT, Goldberg M, Sharrar RG. Risk factors for syphilis: cocaine and prostitution . Am J Public Health 1990;80:853-7.Crossref 5. Andrus JK, Fleming DW, Harger DR, et al. Partner notification: can it control epidemic syphilis? Ann Intern Med 1990;112:539-43.Crossref 6. CDC. Guidelines for the prevention and control of congenital syphilis . MMWR 1988;37( (suppl no. S-1) ). 7. Edlin BR, Irwin KL, Faruque S, et al. Intersecting epidemics: crack cocaine use and HIV infection among inner-city young adults . N Engl J Med 1994;331:1422-7.Crossref 8. Plummer FA, Simonsen JN, Cameron DW, et al. Cofactors in male-female sexual transmission of HIV . J Infect Dis 1991;163:233-9.Crossref 9. Otten MW, Zaidi AA, Peterman TA, Rolfs RT, Witte JJ. High rate of HIV seroconversion among patients attending urban sexually transmitted disease clinics . AIDS 1994;8:549-53.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Outbreak of Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Baltimore City, Maryland, 1995

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 132 (5) – May 1, 1996

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1996.03890290017002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract FROM 1993 to 1995, the number of primary and secondary syphilis cases reported in Baltimore City (1990 population: 736,014) increased 97%, from 179 to 352 cases per year. To identify potential reasons for this increase, CDC, in collaboration with the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, analyzed data about primary and secondary syphilis cases during 1992-1995 and about temporal trends in factors that may affect syphilis rates (e.g., partner-notification results, access to medical care, and community illicit-drug use). In addition, data were analyzed from the two public sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in Baltimore City. BCHD collects demographic data for all cases of reported syphilis among patients who reside in Baltimore City and attempts to interview and provide partner notification and treatment for these patients. This report summarizes the results of the analysis, which suggest the outbreak has been associated with decreases References 1. Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Annual medical examiner data, 1994: data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network. Rockville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1995. 2. Office of Applied Studies, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Preliminary estimates from the Drug Abuse Warning Network: 1994 preliminary estimates of drugrelated emergency department episodes. Rockville, Maryland: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1995. (Advance report no. 11). 3. Nakashima AK, Rolfs RT, Flock ML, Kilmarx P, Greenspan JR. Epidemiology of syphilis in the United States, 1941-1993 . Sex Transm Dis 1996; 23:16-23.Crossref 4. Rolfs RT, Goldberg M, Sharrar RG. Risk factors for syphilis: cocaine and prostitution . Am J Public Health 1990;80:853-7.Crossref 5. Andrus JK, Fleming DW, Harger DR, et al. Partner notification: can it control epidemic syphilis? Ann Intern Med 1990;112:539-43.Crossref 6. CDC. Guidelines for the prevention and control of congenital syphilis . MMWR 1988;37( (suppl no. S-1) ). 7. Edlin BR, Irwin KL, Faruque S, et al. Intersecting epidemics: crack cocaine use and HIV infection among inner-city young adults . N Engl J Med 1994;331:1422-7.Crossref 8. Plummer FA, Simonsen JN, Cameron DW, et al. Cofactors in male-female sexual transmission of HIV . J Infect Dis 1991;163:233-9.Crossref 9. Otten MW, Zaidi AA, Peterman TA, Rolfs RT, Witte JJ. High rate of HIV seroconversion among patients attending urban sexually transmitted disease clinics . AIDS 1994;8:549-53.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1996

References