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Ototoxicity of Chloroquine

Ototoxicity of Chloroquine Abstract CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE is a valuable drug used in the control of malaria and the treatment of amebiasis. The drug was developed in the United States during World War II for use as an antimalarial agent because of the shortage of quinine; the drug had been synthesized and studied as early as 1934 in Germany. Chloroquine is related chemically to quinine and, because of this similarity, has been suspected of being an ototoxic drug.1 It is currently being used for the treatment of malaria, amebiasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and for discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus. Side reactions such as skin eruption, bleaching of the hair, partial alopecia, retinopathy and blurred vision are not unusual.2 The drug is usually given by mouth, and is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract when an acid medium is present. The medication can, however, be given intramuscularly. The usual dose is 0.5 gm/day for antimalarial References 1. Hart, C.W., and Naunton, R.F.: The Ototoxicity of Chloroquine Phosphate , Arch Otolaryng 80:407-412 ( (Oct) ) 1964.Crossref 2. Chloroquine Retinopathy , editorial, JAMA 195:154 ( (Feb 28) ) 1966. 3. Mason, J.R; Khurshid, K.; and Frewing, L.H.: Fatal Chloroquine Poisoning: Two More Cases , JAMA 188:187 ( (May 11) ) 1954. 4. Kiel, F.W.: Chloroquine Suicide , JAMA 190:238-239 ( (Nov 16) ) 1954. 5. Crowe, S.J.; Guild, S.R.; and Polvogt, L.M.: Observations on the Pathology of High Tone Deafness , Bull Hopkins Hosp 54:315-379 ( (Dec) ) 1933. 6. Schuknecht, H.F.: Techniques for Study of Cochlear Function and Pathology in Experimental Animals , Arch Otolaryng 58:377-397 ( (Oct) ) 1953.Crossref 7. Meyer, F., and Thorndyke, V.: Passage of Drugs Across Placenta , Amer J Obstet Gynec 84:1778-1798 ( (Dec) ) 1963. 8. Lindsay, J.R., and Hemenway, W.G.: Inner Ear Pathology Due to Measles , Ann Otol 63:754-771 ( (Sept) ) 1954. 9. Lindsay, J.R., et al: Inner Ear Pathology Following Maternal Rubella , Ann Otol 62:1201-1218 ( (Dec) ) 1953. 10. Rosendal, T.: Aplasia Hypoplasia of Otic Labyrinth After Thalidomide , Acta Radiol 3:225-236 ( (May) ) 1965. 11. Covell, W.P.: Cytologic Study of Effects of Drugs on Cochlea , Arch Otolaryng 23:633-641 ( (June) ) 1936.Crossref 12. Hennebert, D., and Fernandez, C.: Ototoxicity of Quinine in Experimental Animals , Arch Otolaryng 70:321-333 ( (Sept) ) 1959.Crossref 13. Taylor, M.H.: Prenatal Medication as a Possible Etiologic Factor of Deafness in the Newborn , Arch Otolaryng 20:790-803 ( (Dec) ) 1934.Crossref 14. Dewar, W.A., and Mann, H.M.: Chloroquine in Lupus , Lancet 1:780 ( (April 10) ) 1954.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1968.00770010372008
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE is a valuable drug used in the control of malaria and the treatment of amebiasis. The drug was developed in the United States during World War II for use as an antimalarial agent because of the shortage of quinine; the drug had been synthesized and studied as early as 1934 in Germany. Chloroquine is related chemically to quinine and, because of this similarity, has been suspected of being an ototoxic drug.1 It is currently being used for the treatment of malaria, amebiasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and for discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus. Side reactions such as skin eruption, bleaching of the hair, partial alopecia, retinopathy and blurred vision are not unusual.2 The drug is usually given by mouth, and is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract when an acid medium is present. The medication can, however, be given intramuscularly. The usual dose is 0.5 gm/day for antimalarial References 1. Hart, C.W., and Naunton, R.F.: The Ototoxicity of Chloroquine Phosphate , Arch Otolaryng 80:407-412 ( (Oct) ) 1964.Crossref 2. Chloroquine Retinopathy , editorial, JAMA 195:154 ( (Feb 28) ) 1966. 3. Mason, J.R; Khurshid, K.; and Frewing, L.H.: Fatal Chloroquine Poisoning: Two More Cases , JAMA 188:187 ( (May 11) ) 1954. 4. Kiel, F.W.: Chloroquine Suicide , JAMA 190:238-239 ( (Nov 16) ) 1954. 5. Crowe, S.J.; Guild, S.R.; and Polvogt, L.M.: Observations on the Pathology of High Tone Deafness , Bull Hopkins Hosp 54:315-379 ( (Dec) ) 1933. 6. Schuknecht, H.F.: Techniques for Study of Cochlear Function and Pathology in Experimental Animals , Arch Otolaryng 58:377-397 ( (Oct) ) 1953.Crossref 7. Meyer, F., and Thorndyke, V.: Passage of Drugs Across Placenta , Amer J Obstet Gynec 84:1778-1798 ( (Dec) ) 1963. 8. Lindsay, J.R., and Hemenway, W.G.: Inner Ear Pathology Due to Measles , Ann Otol 63:754-771 ( (Sept) ) 1954. 9. Lindsay, J.R., et al: Inner Ear Pathology Following Maternal Rubella , Ann Otol 62:1201-1218 ( (Dec) ) 1953. 10. Rosendal, T.: Aplasia Hypoplasia of Otic Labyrinth After Thalidomide , Acta Radiol 3:225-236 ( (May) ) 1965. 11. Covell, W.P.: Cytologic Study of Effects of Drugs on Cochlea , Arch Otolaryng 23:633-641 ( (June) ) 1936.Crossref 12. Hennebert, D., and Fernandez, C.: Ototoxicity of Quinine in Experimental Animals , Arch Otolaryng 70:321-333 ( (Sept) ) 1959.Crossref 13. Taylor, M.H.: Prenatal Medication as a Possible Etiologic Factor of Deafness in the Newborn , Arch Otolaryng 20:790-803 ( (Dec) ) 1934.Crossref 14. Dewar, W.A., and Mann, H.M.: Chloroquine in Lupus , Lancet 1:780 ( (April 10) ) 1954.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1968

References