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OTITIS EXTERNA DIFFUSA ASSOCIATED WITH SECONDARY ANEMIA

OTITIS EXTERNA DIFFUSA ASSOCIATED WITH SECONDARY ANEMIA This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract While I hesitate to report on a clinical entity commonly encountered by otolaryngologists, I feel that since I learned something from these cases, they are worth at least a passing comment. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.—A 28 year old white woman complained of pain in the right ear and in the postauricular region. The bony portion of the canal of the right ear was uniformly beefy red; the drum, while slightly red, was thought to be normal, as was borne out by further clinical tests. The patient was given local treatment, such as the application of packs wet with cresatin-Sulzberger (metacresylacetate) and the exposure of the affected regions to heat. There was immediate improvement, but after several treatments the original condition recurred. After about six weeks of painstaking treatment, including the administration of a Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus albus vaccine, the condition was about the same. The patient suggested http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

OTITIS EXTERNA DIFFUSA ASSOCIATED WITH SECONDARY ANEMIA

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 31 (6) – Jun 1, 1940

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1940 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1940.00660010989010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract While I hesitate to report on a clinical entity commonly encountered by otolaryngologists, I feel that since I learned something from these cases, they are worth at least a passing comment. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.—A 28 year old white woman complained of pain in the right ear and in the postauricular region. The bony portion of the canal of the right ear was uniformly beefy red; the drum, while slightly red, was thought to be normal, as was borne out by further clinical tests. The patient was given local treatment, such as the application of packs wet with cresatin-Sulzberger (metacresylacetate) and the exposure of the affected regions to heat. There was immediate improvement, but after several treatments the original condition recurred. After about six weeks of painstaking treatment, including the administration of a Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus albus vaccine, the condition was about the same. The patient suggested

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1940

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