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OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE MANDIBLE

OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE MANDIBLE The presentation of this paper is made with the thought of possibly aiding in a better understanding of osteomyelitis of the mandible through a full discussion by members of this section. The disease is one that should interest not only the surgeon, but also the physician and dentist. All three practitioners have opportunity to observe and study this destructive and not infrequently fatal disease. The family physician and the family dentist are, by virtue of their intimate relationship to the patient, in a position to recognize symptoms of osteomyelitis developing in the mandible, and can frequently institute efficient treatment for its arrest. Yet, how often is the disease permitted to establish itself before adequate measures are taken to bring about its control. General diseases, such as scarlet fever or measles, may so interfere with the nourishment of the jaw as to permit the entrance of pus-producing organisms. Tuberculosis and syphilis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

OSTEOMYELITIS OF THE MANDIBLE

JAMA , Volume 85 (23) – Dec 5, 1925

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02670230034008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The presentation of this paper is made with the thought of possibly aiding in a better understanding of osteomyelitis of the mandible through a full discussion by members of this section. The disease is one that should interest not only the surgeon, but also the physician and dentist. All three practitioners have opportunity to observe and study this destructive and not infrequently fatal disease. The family physician and the family dentist are, by virtue of their intimate relationship to the patient, in a position to recognize symptoms of osteomyelitis developing in the mandible, and can frequently institute efficient treatment for its arrest. Yet, how often is the disease permitted to establish itself before adequate measures are taken to bring about its control. General diseases, such as scarlet fever or measles, may so interfere with the nourishment of the jaw as to permit the entrance of pus-producing organisms. Tuberculosis and syphilis

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 5, 1925

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