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Osteoma Cutis

Osteoma Cutis THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVI OCTOBER, 1908 NO. 10 STOPFORD TAYLOR, M. D., and R. W. MACKENNA, M. A., M. D., Physicians to the Liverpool Skin Hospital. Case H. C., Female, aged 15 months—Was brought to the Liverpool Skin Hospital in November 1907. The child's family history was good. The father and the mother were both living and healthy, though the mother had a slight degree of anæmia. There was no history of syphilis, alcoholism, rheumatism, rickets or other bone disease in the family, nor any stigma of nervous affections. The patient was the fifth child and the only girl in the family. During the latter half of her pregnancy with this child, the mother had several attacks of severe flooding, for which no cause could be ascertained. Apart from these hæmorrhages the mother's health during gestation was good, her food was ample, and her general hygienic surroundings were satisfactory. There was no history of “maternal impressions.” J Cutan Dis. 1908;26(10):440-452. And Jacob took him rods of fresh poplar, and of the almond and of the plane-tree; and peeled white streaks in them, making the white appear which was in the rods. And he set the rods which he had peeled over against the flocks in the gutters in the watering-troughs where the flocks came to drink; and they conceived when they came to drink. And the flocks conceived at the sight of the rods, and the flocks brought forth streaked, speckled, and spotted.—Genesis 30:37-39. Nina, an astral twin: I’m sorry, Mark, I just don't believe there's a life after this one. Mark, telepathically: Nina, sometimes I’m not even sure I believe in this one. Jacob's intentional effort to fleck the fleece of his flock is an example of maternal impression, the concept that a pregnant woman's experiences can be directly imprinted on her developing fetus. For example, Ambroise Paré claimed to have seen a frog-faced boy whose mother had conceived him while holding a toad in her hand.1 As an explanation for birth defects, maternal impression was particularly popular in the 17th and 18th centuries. Nicolas de Malebranche related the case of an expectant mother who witnessed a criminal being tortured on the wheel; her child was born with the same broken bones.2 Joseph Merrick, aka The Elephant Man, attributed his deformities to his mother having been frightened by an elephant during her pregnancy. That maternal impression could be considered a possibility as late as 1908 boggles my mind, especially considering that we now know that birth defects are not caused by impressions, but rather by the developing fetus's experiences in prior lifetimes. Yes, buckaroo, it's true. Dr Ian Stevenson, late of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatric Medicine, devoted his professional career to proving that birthmarks were not random occurrences, but proof of reincarnation. In his magnum opus, Reincarnation and Biology, Dr Stevenson documented over 200 cases in which birthmarks corresponded to accidental or intentional cutaneous markings on previously deceased persons. For each case, Dr Stevenson gave supporting evidence linking the living and the dead such as dreams predicting the reincarnation, recognition of significant personages or possessions from the previous life, and shared preferences or phobias. Dr Stevenson did not deny the possibility of maternal impression. Indeed, he considered maternal impression the most likely explanation for birthmarks that could not be explained by reincarnation.3(p175) An a priori acceptance of reincarnation is not necessary to approach Dr Stevenson's work; what he does demand is an abandonment of some fundamental tenets of the scientific method. Dr Stevenson explicitly states that testable hypotheses are inimical to his methodology3(p725) and that belief is essential to the outcome of any experiment.3(p878) I read Dr Stevenson's tome with a mixture of ineradicable skepticism, courtesy of my analytic Western education, and wide-eyed open-mindedness, based on my own personal experiences with mysticism and the occult. On February 8, 2007, Dr Stevenson shuffled off this mortal coil.4 Lest anything come back to haunt me, I will withhold further comment, observing the sound advice: De mortuis nil nisi bonum. References 1. To learn why she was copulating while holding the frog, see CA Pickover. The Girl Who Gave Birth to Rabbits: A True Medical Mystery. Amherst, NY Prometheus Books2000;167- 169 2. Retrospectively and more rationally ascribed to osteogenesis imperfecta 3. Stevenson I Reincarnation and Biology: A Contribution to the Etiology of Birthmarks and Birth Defects. Westport, CT Praeger Press1997; 4. At least temporarily http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Osteoma Cutis

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 144 (10) – Oct 20, 2008

Osteoma Cutis

Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVI OCTOBER, 1908 NO. 10 STOPFORD TAYLOR, M. D., and R. W. MACKENNA, M. A., M. D., Physicians to the Liverpool Skin Hospital. Case H. C., Female, aged 15 months—Was brought to the Liverpool Skin Hospital in November 1907. The child's family history was good. The father and the mother were both living and healthy, though the mother had a slight degree of anæmia. There was no history of syphilis, alcoholism, rheumatism, rickets or other...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.144.10.1275
Publisher site
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Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVI OCTOBER, 1908 NO. 10 STOPFORD TAYLOR, M. D., and R. W. MACKENNA, M. A., M. D., Physicians to the Liverpool Skin Hospital. Case H. C., Female, aged 15 months—Was brought to the Liverpool Skin Hospital in November 1907. The child's family history was good. The father and the mother were both living and healthy, though the mother had a slight degree of anæmia. There was no history of syphilis, alcoholism, rheumatism, rickets or other bone disease in the family, nor any stigma of nervous affections. The patient was the fifth child and the only girl in the family. During the latter half of her pregnancy with this child, the mother had several attacks of severe flooding, for which no cause could be ascertained. Apart from these hæmorrhages the mother's health during gestation was good, her food was ample, and her general hygienic surroundings were satisfactory. There was no history of “maternal impressions.” J Cutan Dis. 1908;26(10):440-452. And Jacob took him rods of fresh poplar, and of the almond and of the plane-tree; and peeled white streaks in them, making the white appear which was in the rods. And he set the rods which he had peeled over against the flocks in the gutters in the watering-troughs where the flocks came to drink; and they conceived when they came to drink. And the flocks conceived at the sight of the rods, and the flocks brought forth streaked, speckled, and spotted.—Genesis 30:37-39. Nina, an astral twin: I’m sorry, Mark, I just don't believe there's a life after this one. Mark, telepathically: Nina, sometimes I’m not even sure I believe in this one. Jacob's intentional effort to fleck the fleece of his flock is an example of maternal impression, the concept that a pregnant woman's experiences can be directly imprinted on her developing fetus. For example, Ambroise Paré claimed to have seen a frog-faced boy whose mother had conceived him while holding a toad in her hand.1 As an explanation for birth defects, maternal impression was particularly popular in the 17th and 18th centuries. Nicolas de Malebranche related the case of an expectant mother who witnessed a criminal being tortured on the wheel; her child was born with the same broken bones.2 Joseph Merrick, aka The Elephant Man, attributed his deformities to his mother having been frightened by an elephant during her pregnancy. That maternal impression could be considered a possibility as late as 1908 boggles my mind, especially considering that we now know that birth defects are not caused by impressions, but rather by the developing fetus's experiences in prior lifetimes. Yes, buckaroo, it's true. Dr Ian Stevenson, late of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatric Medicine, devoted his professional career to proving that birthmarks were not random occurrences, but proof of reincarnation. In his magnum opus, Reincarnation and Biology, Dr Stevenson documented over 200 cases in which birthmarks corresponded to accidental or intentional cutaneous markings on previously deceased persons. For each case, Dr Stevenson gave supporting evidence linking the living and the dead such as dreams predicting the reincarnation, recognition of significant personages or possessions from the previous life, and shared preferences or phobias. Dr Stevenson did not deny the possibility of maternal impression. Indeed, he considered maternal impression the most likely explanation for birthmarks that could not be explained by reincarnation.3(p175) An a priori acceptance of reincarnation is not necessary to approach Dr Stevenson's work; what he does demand is an abandonment of some fundamental tenets of the scientific method. Dr Stevenson explicitly states that testable hypotheses are inimical to his methodology3(p725) and that belief is essential to the outcome of any experiment.3(p878) I read Dr Stevenson's tome with a mixture of ineradicable skepticism, courtesy of my analytic Western education, and wide-eyed open-mindedness, based on my own personal experiences with mysticism and the occult. On February 8, 2007, Dr Stevenson shuffled off this mortal coil.4 Lest anything come back to haunt me, I will withhold further comment, observing the sound advice: De mortuis nil nisi bonum. References 1. To learn why she was copulating while holding the frog, see CA Pickover. The Girl Who Gave Birth to Rabbits: A True Medical Mystery. Amherst, NY Prometheus Books2000;167- 169 2. Retrospectively and more rationally ascribed to osteogenesis imperfecta 3. Stevenson I Reincarnation and Biology: A Contribution to the Etiology of Birthmarks and Birth Defects. Westport, CT Praeger Press1997; 4. At least temporarily

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 20, 2008

References