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Organoids Reveal Clues to Gut-Brain Communication

Organoids Reveal Clues to Gut-Brain Communication News & Analysis Bench to Bedside Tracy Hampton, PhD ewresearchisprovidinginsightson how enterochromaffin cells (ECs), N specialized cells in the intestine, sense potentially noxious substances and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fi- bers, thereby relaying important informa- tion to the brain. These ECs are thought to constitute less than 1% of total intestinal epithelia, but they produce more than 90% of the body’s serotonin and have been sug- gested to affect a variety of physiological and pathophysiological states, including gastrointestinal motility and secretion, nausea, and visceral hypersensitivity. How- ever, researchers have yet to fully under- stand how these rare and unique cell types transduce chemosensory information to the nervous system. To investigate, a team led by investiga- tors at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) developed an experi- mental system based on gut-mimicking or- ganoids. Organioids are 3 dimensional tis- sues,grownartificiallyinvitrofromstemcells that form rudimentary organs with similar anatomical and functional properties. The findings were published in Cell. Cosenior author David Julius, PhD, a Intestinal organoids (pictured above) are being used to study chemosensory communication between the gut and nervous system, as well as elucidate the pathophysiology underlying intestinal diseases such as IBS. professor and chair of UCSF's Department http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Organoids Reveal Clues to Gut-Brain Communication

JAMA , Volume 318 (9) – Sep 5, 2017

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2017.11545
pmid
28873141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

News & Analysis Bench to Bedside Tracy Hampton, PhD ewresearchisprovidinginsightson how enterochromaffin cells (ECs), N specialized cells in the intestine, sense potentially noxious substances and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fi- bers, thereby relaying important informa- tion to the brain. These ECs are thought to constitute less than 1% of total intestinal epithelia, but they produce more than 90% of the body’s serotonin and have been sug- gested to affect a variety of physiological and pathophysiological states, including gastrointestinal motility and secretion, nausea, and visceral hypersensitivity. How- ever, researchers have yet to fully under- stand how these rare and unique cell types transduce chemosensory information to the nervous system. To investigate, a team led by investiga- tors at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) developed an experi- mental system based on gut-mimicking or- ganoids. Organioids are 3 dimensional tis- sues,grownartificiallyinvitrofromstemcells that form rudimentary organs with similar anatomical and functional properties. The findings were published in Cell. Cosenior author David Julius, PhD, a Intestinal organoids (pictured above) are being used to study chemosensory communication between the gut and nervous system, as well as elucidate the pathophysiology underlying intestinal diseases such as IBS. professor and chair of UCSF's Department

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 5, 2017

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