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Organization of a Psychiatric Clinic For Children

Organization of a Psychiatric Clinic For Children Abstract Growing demands for mental health service, training, and research are pressing psychiatric clinics to make pivotal decisions. One trend is to limit the selection of patients to those the clinic is best equipped to handle. An opposite trend is to modify clinic practices to meet the pressures placed upon it.10 This paper follows the second trend and is based on the premise that effective service is the foundation of psychiatric training and the goal of clinical research.2,5 In clinical medicine treatment is continually revised to bring it into closer harmony with the needs of the patient. Following this tradition we believe that the psychiatric clinic should respond to those who call upon it for service. If it fails to meet this responsibility, the clinic must anticipate declining usefulness to society. One way to increase service is to expand the clinic staff. It is References 1. Ackerman, N.: Exploring the Base for Family Therapy , New York: The Family Service Association of America, 1961. 2. Caplan, G.: Prevention of Mental Disorders in Children , New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1961. 3. Cooper, S.: Emergencies in a Psychiatric Clinic , Social Casework 41:137-138, 1960. 4. Gardner, G. E.: " Clinical Research in a Child Psychiatry Setting ," in Parad, H. J.: Ego Psychology and Dynamic Casework , New York: Family Service Association of America, 1958. 5. Grayson, R. S.: " The Psychiatric Emergency Clinic: Implications for Community Mental Health ," in Casework Papers , New York: Family Service Association of America, 1961. 6. Basic Concepts in Child Psychiatry, Report No. 12, New York: Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, 1950. 7. The Diagnostic Process in Child Psychiatry, Report No. 38, New York: Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, 1957. 8. Hire, A. W., and Stover, M.: Assignment and Pre-Assignment Procedures in Psychotherapeutic Team Work , Amer J Orthopsychiat 30:53-55, 1960.Crossref 9. Kemple, R. P., and Benton, A. L.: Factors Affecting Progress in Orthopsychiatry Research , Amer J Orthopsychiat 32:527-532, 1962.Crossref 10. Maholick, L. T., and Shapiro, D. S.: Changing Concepts of Psychiatric Evaluation , Amer J Psychiat 119:233-236, 1962. 11. Vogel, E. F., and Bell, N. W.: The Emotionally Disturbed Child as a Family Scapegoat , Psychoanalysis 47:21-42, 1960. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

Organization of a Psychiatric Clinic For Children

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1964.01720220010003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Growing demands for mental health service, training, and research are pressing psychiatric clinics to make pivotal decisions. One trend is to limit the selection of patients to those the clinic is best equipped to handle. An opposite trend is to modify clinic practices to meet the pressures placed upon it.10 This paper follows the second trend and is based on the premise that effective service is the foundation of psychiatric training and the goal of clinical research.2,5 In clinical medicine treatment is continually revised to bring it into closer harmony with the needs of the patient. Following this tradition we believe that the psychiatric clinic should respond to those who call upon it for service. If it fails to meet this responsibility, the clinic must anticipate declining usefulness to society. One way to increase service is to expand the clinic staff. It is References 1. Ackerman, N.: Exploring the Base for Family Therapy , New York: The Family Service Association of America, 1961. 2. Caplan, G.: Prevention of Mental Disorders in Children , New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1961. 3. Cooper, S.: Emergencies in a Psychiatric Clinic , Social Casework 41:137-138, 1960. 4. Gardner, G. E.: " Clinical Research in a Child Psychiatry Setting ," in Parad, H. J.: Ego Psychology and Dynamic Casework , New York: Family Service Association of America, 1958. 5. Grayson, R. S.: " The Psychiatric Emergency Clinic: Implications for Community Mental Health ," in Casework Papers , New York: Family Service Association of America, 1961. 6. Basic Concepts in Child Psychiatry, Report No. 12, New York: Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, 1950. 7. The Diagnostic Process in Child Psychiatry, Report No. 38, New York: Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, 1957. 8. Hire, A. W., and Stover, M.: Assignment and Pre-Assignment Procedures in Psychotherapeutic Team Work , Amer J Orthopsychiat 30:53-55, 1960.Crossref 9. Kemple, R. P., and Benton, A. L.: Factors Affecting Progress in Orthopsychiatry Research , Amer J Orthopsychiat 32:527-532, 1962.Crossref 10. Maholick, L. T., and Shapiro, D. S.: Changing Concepts of Psychiatric Evaluation , Amer J Psychiat 119:233-236, 1962. 11. Vogel, E. F., and Bell, N. W.: The Emotionally Disturbed Child as a Family Scapegoat , Psychoanalysis 47:21-42, 1960.

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1964

References