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Organic Brain Syndromes: Prognostic Significance in General Medical Patients

Organic Brain Syndromes: Prognostic Significance in General Medical Patients Abstract WHEN SEEN on the general medical and surgical wards of a hospital, organic brain syndromes may indicate a poor prognosis with a high mortality. In 1964, Guze and Cantwell1 reported a study of 117 patients with organic brain syndromes seen in consultation over a four-year period. Their findings, among other things, indicated a high mortality rate during the index admission when compared to the mortality of all hospital admissions during the same period. They concluded that "These figures indicate that patients referred for psychiatric consultation (presumably because they created a disturbance on the ward) who received a diagnosis of `organic brain' syndrome were much sicker than other general hospital patients." They point out, however, that "The data do not permit any conclusions, of course, about the comparative prognosis between patients of similar age, sex, and medical diagnosis with and without the psychiatric References 1. Guze, S.B., and Cantwell, D.P.: The Prognosis in "Organic Brain" Syndromes , Amer J Psychiat 120:878-881, 1964. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

Organic Brain Syndromes: Prognostic Significance in General Medical Patients

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1967.01730270109015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract WHEN SEEN on the general medical and surgical wards of a hospital, organic brain syndromes may indicate a poor prognosis with a high mortality. In 1964, Guze and Cantwell1 reported a study of 117 patients with organic brain syndromes seen in consultation over a four-year period. Their findings, among other things, indicated a high mortality rate during the index admission when compared to the mortality of all hospital admissions during the same period. They concluded that "These figures indicate that patients referred for psychiatric consultation (presumably because they created a disturbance on the ward) who received a diagnosis of `organic brain' syndrome were much sicker than other general hospital patients." They point out, however, that "The data do not permit any conclusions, of course, about the comparative prognosis between patients of similar age, sex, and medical diagnosis with and without the psychiatric References 1. Guze, S.B., and Cantwell, D.P.: The Prognosis in "Organic Brain" Syndromes , Amer J Psychiat 120:878-881, 1964.

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1967

References

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