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Optimizing the Use of Heart Transplant in the United States

Optimizing the Use of Heart Transplant in the United States Opinion EDITORIAL Alexander T. Sandhu, MD, MS; Y. Joseph Woo, MD; Kiran K. Khush, MD, MAS More than 7300 individuals are on waiting lists for heart trans- association between heart transplant and survival at a given plant in the United States during the course of a year, yet only center. It is known, for example, that transplant centers list pa- about 3200 transplants are performed annually, with a wait- tients with varying disease severity. Hospitals that list patients ing list mortality rate of 10% between 2015 and 2017. This un- with greater disease severity have higher waiting list mortal- acceptably high waiting list ity. If these patients have high rates of survival after transplant mortality is due, in part, to a (potentially related to excellent quality of care after trans- Related article page 1789 shortage of suitable donor or- plant), these centers will achieve substantial differences be- gans. Because the need for donor hearts continues to exceed tween waiting list mortality and mortality after transplant. This supply, the optimal distribution of available organs remains a equates to greater survival benefit among high-quality centers challenge. Ideally, donor hearts would be allocated to pa- that are treating patients with more severe http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Optimizing the Use of Heart Transplant in the United States

JAMA , Volume 322 (18) – Nov 12, 2019

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2019.16002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Alexander T. Sandhu, MD, MS; Y. Joseph Woo, MD; Kiran K. Khush, MD, MAS More than 7300 individuals are on waiting lists for heart trans- association between heart transplant and survival at a given plant in the United States during the course of a year, yet only center. It is known, for example, that transplant centers list pa- about 3200 transplants are performed annually, with a wait- tients with varying disease severity. Hospitals that list patients ing list mortality rate of 10% between 2015 and 2017. This un- with greater disease severity have higher waiting list mortal- acceptably high waiting list ity. If these patients have high rates of survival after transplant mortality is due, in part, to a (potentially related to excellent quality of care after trans- Related article page 1789 shortage of suitable donor or- plant), these centers will achieve substantial differences be- gans. Because the need for donor hearts continues to exceed tween waiting list mortality and mortality after transplant. This supply, the optimal distribution of available organs remains a equates to greater survival benefit among high-quality centers challenge. Ideally, donor hearts would be allocated to pa- that are treating patients with more severe

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 12, 2019

References