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Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial Study-Reply

Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial Study-Reply Abstract In reply We appreciate the opportunity to respond to Coyle's thoughtful comments. As we noted in our article on the results of the ONTT, the beneficial effect of the regimen of intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids in delaying the development of clinically definite MS was remarkably consistent across strata of the different risk factors for MS, including gender. The type of comparison suggested by Coyle was performed with a stratified analysis as well as by inclusion of an interaction term between gender and treatment in a proportional hazards model; these analyses did not indicate a differential treatment effect by gender. Furthermore, our 2-year follow-up has not supported the finding of the previous study,1 referenced by Coyle, that indicated that the 15-year risk of MS is greater in women with optic neuritis than in men with optic neuritis. In our cohort, MS developed within 2 years in 40 (13.3%) of References 1. Rizzo JF, Lessell S. Risk of developing multiple sclerosis after uncomplicated optic neuritis: a long-term prospective study . Neurology . 1988;38:185-190.Crossref 2. Beck RW, Cleary PA, Trobe JD, et al. The effect of corticosteroids for acute optic neuritis on the subsequent development of multiple sclerosis . N Engl J Med . 1993;329:1764-1769.Crossref 3. Morrissey SP, Miller DH, Kendall BE, et al. The significance of brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities at presentation with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis . Brain . 1993;116:135-146.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial Study-Reply

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 112 (10) – Oct 1, 1994

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1994.01090220024003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In reply We appreciate the opportunity to respond to Coyle's thoughtful comments. As we noted in our article on the results of the ONTT, the beneficial effect of the regimen of intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids in delaying the development of clinically definite MS was remarkably consistent across strata of the different risk factors for MS, including gender. The type of comparison suggested by Coyle was performed with a stratified analysis as well as by inclusion of an interaction term between gender and treatment in a proportional hazards model; these analyses did not indicate a differential treatment effect by gender. Furthermore, our 2-year follow-up has not supported the finding of the previous study,1 referenced by Coyle, that indicated that the 15-year risk of MS is greater in women with optic neuritis than in men with optic neuritis. In our cohort, MS developed within 2 years in 40 (13.3%) of References 1. Rizzo JF, Lessell S. Risk of developing multiple sclerosis after uncomplicated optic neuritis: a long-term prospective study . Neurology . 1988;38:185-190.Crossref 2. Beck RW, Cleary PA, Trobe JD, et al. The effect of corticosteroids for acute optic neuritis on the subsequent development of multiple sclerosis . N Engl J Med . 1993;329:1764-1769.Crossref 3. Morrissey SP, Miller DH, Kendall BE, et al. The significance of brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities at presentation with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis . Brain . 1993;116:135-146.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1994

References