Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

ON WRITING TO BE READ

ON WRITING TO BE READ Abstract DOCTORS and scientists usually seem to dislike writing about their work: "I hate the writing-up," they often say. Perhaps it is the "up" that does the harm. If authors were content to write instead of writing-up, many mistakes might be avoided. Writing-up suggests that the author feels the need to do something beyond communicating his facts and thoughts. Authors engaged in writing-up often seem to think that they must make a powerful impression. Some of this may arise from deliberate or unconscious imitation of works which are justly regarded as classics. Such works are classics because they contain valuable new facts and ideas, not because they may have been written in the grand manner, or perhaps directed with particular energy against someone whose views the author wished to contradict. Incidental attributes of this kind do not prevent papers with new and good information from becoming classics, but they are not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

ON WRITING TO BE READ

A.M.A. Archives Surgery , Volume 65 (2) – Aug 1, 1952

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/on-writing-to-be-read-NU8GTavNV0
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020225002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract DOCTORS and scientists usually seem to dislike writing about their work: "I hate the writing-up," they often say. Perhaps it is the "up" that does the harm. If authors were content to write instead of writing-up, many mistakes might be avoided. Writing-up suggests that the author feels the need to do something beyond communicating his facts and thoughts. Authors engaged in writing-up often seem to think that they must make a powerful impression. Some of this may arise from deliberate or unconscious imitation of works which are justly regarded as classics. Such works are classics because they contain valuable new facts and ideas, not because they may have been written in the grand manner, or perhaps directed with particular energy against someone whose views the author wished to contradict. Incidental attributes of this kind do not prevent papers with new and good information from becoming classics, but they are not

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1952

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month