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Olfaction and Sinus Surgery

Olfaction and Sinus Surgery This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Although many patients (50%) with sinus disease report olfactory loss, the improvement after sinus surgery has been poorly studied. Aaron L. Shapiro, MD, and Charles P. Kimmelman, MD, New York, NY, felt that a prospective study was essential to counsel patients properly. At the September 1991 meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery in Kansas City, Mo, Drs Shapiro and Kimmelman presented their results. Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, they evaluated 36 consecutive patients undergoing sinus surgery. Administering this 40-item test (microencapsulated stimuli released on scratching an odor-impregnated strip) before and after surgery, the authors compared scores with standardized norms for each patient's age and gender. Thirty patients had improved percentile scores after surgery; the mean improvement was 11.6. Six patients had decreased scores; the mean decrease was 8.6. Classifying these patients as normosic, hypomic, or anosmic, they found that more than 40% of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Olfaction and Sinus Surgery

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Although many patients (50%) with sinus disease report olfactory loss, the improvement after sinus surgery has been poorly studied. Aaron L. Shapiro, MD, and Charles P. Kimmelman, MD, New York, NY, felt that a prospective study was essential to counsel patients properly. At the September 1991 meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1992.01880020014004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Although many patients (50%) with sinus disease report olfactory loss, the improvement after sinus surgery has been poorly studied. Aaron L. Shapiro, MD, and Charles P. Kimmelman, MD, New York, NY, felt that a prospective study was essential to counsel patients properly. At the September 1991 meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery in Kansas City, Mo, Drs Shapiro and Kimmelman presented their results. Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, they evaluated 36 consecutive patients undergoing sinus surgery. Administering this 40-item test (microencapsulated stimuli released on scratching an odor-impregnated strip) before and after surgery, the authors compared scores with standardized norms for each patient's age and gender. Thirty patients had improved percentile scores after surgery; the mean improvement was 11.6. Six patients had decreased scores; the mean decrease was 8.6. Classifying these patients as normosic, hypomic, or anosmic, they found that more than 40% of

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1992

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