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Office Procedures Following Vitreoretinal Surgery

Office Procedures Following Vitreoretinal Surgery Abstract To the Editor. —I read with interest the article by Landers et al1 in the July Archives. While I could conceivably perform many of the procedures in my garage, the cavalier attitude, or lack thereof, to be more precise, toward asepsis disturbs me. There is an ongoing trend toward ever-increasing outpatient surgery for reasons of cost-effectiveness as well as for reducing patient anxiety. Nonetheless, there is no mention of draping the patient or preoperative preparation of the eyelids with any type of antiseptic.The fact that these procedures may be done on a routine basis in a treatment room environment does not preclude the theoretical advantage of swabbing down the slit lamp or the room. It represents a trivialization of basic surgical tenets. If it is not necessary to prepare a patient for an intraocular gas injection or fluid exchange, why are we doing cataract operations in operating rooms References 1. Landers MB III, Robinson D, Olsen KR, et al: Slit-lamp fluid-gas exchange and other office procedures following vitreoretinal surgery . Arch Ophthalmol 1985;103:967-972.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Office Procedures Following Vitreoretinal Surgery

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 103 (11) – Nov 1, 1985

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1985.01050110025008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —I read with interest the article by Landers et al1 in the July Archives. While I could conceivably perform many of the procedures in my garage, the cavalier attitude, or lack thereof, to be more precise, toward asepsis disturbs me. There is an ongoing trend toward ever-increasing outpatient surgery for reasons of cost-effectiveness as well as for reducing patient anxiety. Nonetheless, there is no mention of draping the patient or preoperative preparation of the eyelids with any type of antiseptic.The fact that these procedures may be done on a routine basis in a treatment room environment does not preclude the theoretical advantage of swabbing down the slit lamp or the room. It represents a trivialization of basic surgical tenets. If it is not necessary to prepare a patient for an intraocular gas injection or fluid exchange, why are we doing cataract operations in operating rooms References 1. Landers MB III, Robinson D, Olsen KR, et al: Slit-lamp fluid-gas exchange and other office procedures following vitreoretinal surgery . Arch Ophthalmol 1985;103:967-972.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1985

References