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Ocular Injury and Orbital Fractures

Ocular Injury and Orbital Fractures Abstract To the Editor.—I read with great interest the communication by Arts et al1 regarding ocular injury in the setting of orbital fractures. It is indeed important for the nonophthalmologist to be able to judge clinically the likelihood of significant ocular injury in a given case. It appears that the described use of tonometric readings will help in predicting the presence of such injury, and thus the need for ophthalmic consultation. However, since Schiotz tonometry is contraindicated in the presence of a ruptured globe, I strongly disagree that "manual palpation of the globe should be performed before tonometry." The digital pressure applied in such a maneuver is often greater than that produced by tonometry and could easily cause significant hemorrhage or extrusion of ocular contents. If in doubt about the presence or absence of a rupture, I suggest the safest approach is to protect the eye with a Fox References 1. Arts HA, Eisele DW, Duckert LG. Intraocular pressure as an index of ocular injury in orbital fractures . Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 1989;115:213-216.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Ocular Injury and Orbital Fractures

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—I read with great interest the communication by Arts et al1 regarding ocular injury in the setting of orbital fractures. It is indeed important for the nonophthalmologist to be able to judge clinically the likelihood of significant ocular injury in a given case. It appears that the described use of tonometric readings will help in predicting the presence of such injury, and thus the need for ophthalmic consultation. However, since Schiotz tonometry is...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1989.01860320104029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—I read with great interest the communication by Arts et al1 regarding ocular injury in the setting of orbital fractures. It is indeed important for the nonophthalmologist to be able to judge clinically the likelihood of significant ocular injury in a given case. It appears that the described use of tonometric readings will help in predicting the presence of such injury, and thus the need for ophthalmic consultation. However, since Schiotz tonometry is contraindicated in the presence of a ruptured globe, I strongly disagree that "manual palpation of the globe should be performed before tonometry." The digital pressure applied in such a maneuver is often greater than that produced by tonometry and could easily cause significant hemorrhage or extrusion of ocular contents. If in doubt about the presence or absence of a rupture, I suggest the safest approach is to protect the eye with a Fox References 1. Arts HA, Eisele DW, Duckert LG. Intraocular pressure as an index of ocular injury in orbital fractures . Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 1989;115:213-216.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1989

References

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