Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

OCULAR DYSMETRIA; FLUTTER-LIKE OSCILLATIONS OF THE EYES, AND OPSOCLONUS

OCULAR DYSMETRIA; FLUTTER-LIKE OSCILLATIONS OF THE EYES, AND OPSOCLONUS Abstract THE PHENOMENA here designated ocular motor dysmetria, flutter-like oscillations, and opsoclonus have rarely been referred to in the literature. The term ocular dysmetria is intended to refer to an abnormality of eye movements analogous to dysmetria of the limbs, in which a movement is performed with characteristic overshooting and lack of precision. This is manifest in the eyes by an overshoot on attempted fixation and consequent irregular oscillation of the eyes on changes of fixation. The term flutter-like oscillations is intended to refer to the occurrence of intermittent to-and-fro oscillations of the eyes lasting not more than a few seconds, often associated with changes of fixation but frequently appearing to be spontaneous, and producing an effect that seems most to accord with the designation of "flutter." Opsoclonus is a name that has been proposed to categorize the irregular ("chaotic") and continual oscillations of the eyes such as occur in certain References 1. Opsoclonus is a term suggested by Orzechowski.1 2. Erb, A., cited by Berger.2 3. Thus Elschnig uses the term to indicate the nystagmus of multiple sclerosis, while Noiszewski (cited by Orzechowski1) and Cogan use it in reference to nystagmus of the blind. Still others use it in connection with failure of binocular vision. 4. This must not be confused with the term "fixation nystagmus" used by Luhr and Eckel10 to refer to functionally induced oscillations of the eyes. 5. References 12 and 13. 6. References 14 and 15. 7. Case presentation in Case Records of the Massachusetts General Hospital.17 8. An inability to hold fixation and an overshoot of the eyes have been described in patients with lesions in the right parietal region (Paterson and Zangwill18), but such movements appear to be disturbances of attention rather than primary disturbances of fixation. 9. A possible exception to this is loss of labyrinthine function. I have recently seen a patient with inexcitable labyrinths resulting from streptomycin medication in whom there was an overshoot of the eyes on attempted fixation. 10. References 9 and 11. 11. Orzechowski, K.: De l'ataxie dysmétrique des yeux: Remarques sur l'ataxie des yeux dite myoclonique (opsoclonie, opsochorie) , J. Psychol. u. Neurol. 35:1-18, 1927. 12. Berger, E.: Bemerkung über Nystagmus bei Tabes dorsalis , Arch. Augenh. 21:290, 1890. 13. Berger, E.: Die Sehstörungen bei Tabes dorsalis und Versuch einer einheitlichen Erklärung des Symptomencomplexes der Tabes , Arch. Augenh. 19:391, 1889. 14. Rütimeyer, L.: Über hereditäre Ataxie , Virchows Arch. path. Anat. 91:106, 1883.Crossref 15. Nonne, M.: Über eine eigentümliche familiäre Erkrankungsform des Centralnervensystems , Arch. Psychiat. 22:283, 1890-1891.Crossref 16. Fox, J. C., Jr. and Dodge, R.: Optic Nystagmus: Variations in Nystagmographic Records of Eye Movements , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 22:55 ( (July) ) 1929. 17. Holmes, G.: Symptoms of Acute Cerebellar Injuries Due to Gunshot Injuries , Brain 40:461, 1917. 18. Cogan, D. G.: Neurology of the Ocular Muscles , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1948. 19. Strickland, B.: Letter to the Editor: Poliomyelitis , Lancet 2:369, 1947. 20. Luhr, A. F., and Eckel, J. L.: Fixation and Voluntary Nystagmus: A Clinical Study , Arch. Ophth. 9:625, 1933. 21. Marmion, D. E., and Sandilands, J.: Opsoclonia: A Rare Sign in Polioencephalitis , Lancet 2:508, 1947. 22. Kestenbaum, A.: Clinical Methods of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Examination , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1946, p. 250. 23. Gorman, W. F., and Brock, S.: Periodic Alternating Nystagmus in Friedreich's Ataxia , Am. J. Ophth. 33:860, 1950. 24. Tyczka: Polska gaz. lek. , 1925, Vol. 46. 25. Milkulowski: Polska gaz. lek. , 1925, Vol. 46. 26. Sicard, J. A., and Kudelski, C.: Myclonie oculare encephalitique , Bull. et mém. Soc. méd. hôp. Paris 44:450, 1920 27. Case 38072 : New England J. Med. 246:266, 1952. 28. Paterson, A., and Zangwill, O. L.: Recovery of Spatial Orientation in Post-Traumatic Confusional State , Brain 67:54, 1944. 29. Sklodowski, J.: Die konjugierte Augenoszillation im Verlaufe einer Herderkrankung des Gehirns , Ztschr. ges. Neurol. u. Psychiat. 31:166, 1916. 30. Holmes, G.: Clinical Symptoms of Cerebellar Disease , Lancet 1:1234, 1922. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

OCULAR DYSMETRIA; FLUTTER-LIKE OSCILLATIONS OF THE EYES, AND OPSOCLONUS

A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 51 (3) – Mar 1, 1954

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/ocular-dysmetria-flutter-like-oscillations-of-the-eyes-and-opsoclonus-TEXPLA5yN0
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1954 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040324006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE PHENOMENA here designated ocular motor dysmetria, flutter-like oscillations, and opsoclonus have rarely been referred to in the literature. The term ocular dysmetria is intended to refer to an abnormality of eye movements analogous to dysmetria of the limbs, in which a movement is performed with characteristic overshooting and lack of precision. This is manifest in the eyes by an overshoot on attempted fixation and consequent irregular oscillation of the eyes on changes of fixation. The term flutter-like oscillations is intended to refer to the occurrence of intermittent to-and-fro oscillations of the eyes lasting not more than a few seconds, often associated with changes of fixation but frequently appearing to be spontaneous, and producing an effect that seems most to accord with the designation of "flutter." Opsoclonus is a name that has been proposed to categorize the irregular ("chaotic") and continual oscillations of the eyes such as occur in certain References 1. Opsoclonus is a term suggested by Orzechowski.1 2. Erb, A., cited by Berger.2 3. Thus Elschnig uses the term to indicate the nystagmus of multiple sclerosis, while Noiszewski (cited by Orzechowski1) and Cogan use it in reference to nystagmus of the blind. Still others use it in connection with failure of binocular vision. 4. This must not be confused with the term "fixation nystagmus" used by Luhr and Eckel10 to refer to functionally induced oscillations of the eyes. 5. References 12 and 13. 6. References 14 and 15. 7. Case presentation in Case Records of the Massachusetts General Hospital.17 8. An inability to hold fixation and an overshoot of the eyes have been described in patients with lesions in the right parietal region (Paterson and Zangwill18), but such movements appear to be disturbances of attention rather than primary disturbances of fixation. 9. A possible exception to this is loss of labyrinthine function. I have recently seen a patient with inexcitable labyrinths resulting from streptomycin medication in whom there was an overshoot of the eyes on attempted fixation. 10. References 9 and 11. 11. Orzechowski, K.: De l'ataxie dysmétrique des yeux: Remarques sur l'ataxie des yeux dite myoclonique (opsoclonie, opsochorie) , J. Psychol. u. Neurol. 35:1-18, 1927. 12. Berger, E.: Bemerkung über Nystagmus bei Tabes dorsalis , Arch. Augenh. 21:290, 1890. 13. Berger, E.: Die Sehstörungen bei Tabes dorsalis und Versuch einer einheitlichen Erklärung des Symptomencomplexes der Tabes , Arch. Augenh. 19:391, 1889. 14. Rütimeyer, L.: Über hereditäre Ataxie , Virchows Arch. path. Anat. 91:106, 1883.Crossref 15. Nonne, M.: Über eine eigentümliche familiäre Erkrankungsform des Centralnervensystems , Arch. Psychiat. 22:283, 1890-1891.Crossref 16. Fox, J. C., Jr. and Dodge, R.: Optic Nystagmus: Variations in Nystagmographic Records of Eye Movements , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 22:55 ( (July) ) 1929. 17. Holmes, G.: Symptoms of Acute Cerebellar Injuries Due to Gunshot Injuries , Brain 40:461, 1917. 18. Cogan, D. G.: Neurology of the Ocular Muscles , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1948. 19. Strickland, B.: Letter to the Editor: Poliomyelitis , Lancet 2:369, 1947. 20. Luhr, A. F., and Eckel, J. L.: Fixation and Voluntary Nystagmus: A Clinical Study , Arch. Ophth. 9:625, 1933. 21. Marmion, D. E., and Sandilands, J.: Opsoclonia: A Rare Sign in Polioencephalitis , Lancet 2:508, 1947. 22. Kestenbaum, A.: Clinical Methods of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Examination , New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1946, p. 250. 23. Gorman, W. F., and Brock, S.: Periodic Alternating Nystagmus in Friedreich's Ataxia , Am. J. Ophth. 33:860, 1950. 24. Tyczka: Polska gaz. lek. , 1925, Vol. 46. 25. Milkulowski: Polska gaz. lek. , 1925, Vol. 46. 26. Sicard, J. A., and Kudelski, C.: Myclonie oculare encephalitique , Bull. et mém. Soc. méd. hôp. Paris 44:450, 1920 27. Case 38072 : New England J. Med. 246:266, 1952. 28. Paterson, A., and Zangwill, O. L.: Recovery of Spatial Orientation in Post-Traumatic Confusional State , Brain 67:54, 1944. 29. Sklodowski, J.: Die konjugierte Augenoszillation im Verlaufe einer Herderkrankung des Gehirns , Ztschr. ges. Neurol. u. Psychiat. 31:166, 1916. 30. Holmes, G.: Clinical Symptoms of Cerebellar Disease , Lancet 1:1234, 1922.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1954

References