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OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS DUE TO MINT: REPORT OF TWO CASES

OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS DUE TO MINT: REPORT OF TWO CASES Abstract The literature on contact dermatitis is extensive, and hundreds of different agents have been found responsible, yet I have been unable to find any reports on mint as a cause. Some time ago when I was discussing this subject with Dr. Otto Foerster, he recalled having observed a patient with cheilitis caused by a mint-flavored chewing gum. This is the only instance I have found in which mint has been incriminated as a factor in producing a cutaneous eruption. Although physicians are now familiar with the manifestations and with many of the causes of this type of dermatitis, it is the inability at times to determine the exciting agent which leads to failure in treatment. I therefore wish to present 2 cases which have come to my attention. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.— K. H., a bartender at Miami Beach presented a dermatitis which began in the spring of 1934. References 1. Schwartz, L.: Cutaneous Hazards in the Citrus Fruit Industry , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 37:646 ( (April) ) 1932. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS DUE TO MINT: REPORT OF TWO CASES

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1940 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1940.01490090055004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The literature on contact dermatitis is extensive, and hundreds of different agents have been found responsible, yet I have been unable to find any reports on mint as a cause. Some time ago when I was discussing this subject with Dr. Otto Foerster, he recalled having observed a patient with cheilitis caused by a mint-flavored chewing gum. This is the only instance I have found in which mint has been incriminated as a factor in producing a cutaneous eruption. Although physicians are now familiar with the manifestations and with many of the causes of this type of dermatitis, it is the inability at times to determine the exciting agent which leads to failure in treatment. I therefore wish to present 2 cases which have come to my attention. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.— K. H., a bartender at Miami Beach presented a dermatitis which began in the spring of 1934. References 1. Schwartz, L.: Cutaneous Hazards in the Citrus Fruit Industry , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 37:646 ( (April) ) 1932.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1940

References