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OBSERVATIONS ON THE CAPACITY OF THE STOMACH IN THE FIRST TEN DAYS OF POSTNATAL LIFE

OBSERVATIONS ON THE CAPACITY OF THE STOMACH IN THE FIRST TEN DAYS OF POSTNATAL LIFE In the transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life few organs of the body are more affected than the stomach. The change influences many characters of the organ's morphology, and the position, the mass, the finer structure, and particularly the capacity are rapidly modified and adjusted to the new conditions and functions of postnatal life. The changes in gastric capacity in this period of transition have not been studied very intensively. As early as 1856 Guillot1 published some data regarding physiologic gastric capacity in the first few days of extrauterine life and this was followed somewhat later by a more extensive study by Bouchaud.2 Since that time further information on the subject has been published by Hillebrand,3 Kruger,4 Ssnitkin,5 Cammerer,6 Tuley,7 Jaschke,8 Landois9 and others. The figures presented in most of these studies are not extensive, and are usually incidental to more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

OBSERVATIONS ON THE CAPACITY OF THE STOMACH IN THE FIRST TEN DAYS OF POSTNATAL LIFE

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1920 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1920.01910300056005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life few organs of the body are more affected than the stomach. The change influences many characters of the organ's morphology, and the position, the mass, the finer structure, and particularly the capacity are rapidly modified and adjusted to the new conditions and functions of postnatal life. The changes in gastric capacity in this period of transition have not been studied very intensively. As early as 1856 Guillot1 published some data regarding physiologic gastric capacity in the first few days of extrauterine life and this was followed somewhat later by a more extensive study by Bouchaud.2 Since that time further information on the subject has been published by Hillebrand,3 Kruger,4 Ssnitkin,5 Cammerer,6 Tuley,7 Jaschke,8 Landois9 and others. The figures presented in most of these studies are not extensive, and are usually incidental to more

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1920

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