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Observation of Antacids by Intragastric Photography

Observation of Antacids by Intragastric Photography Abstract CURIOSITY concerning conflicting claims and the availability of a suitable investigating instrument led to this photographic study of gastric antacids. The observations here are photographic and not chemical, yet they constitute an attempt to add useful knowledge concerning the action of the tested drugs in a human stomach. The claims and questions are as follows. Do the antacids really coat an ulcer and the inflamed mucosa like a salve? Are liquid forms more efficient than tablet forms? What, if anything, is the significance of antifoaming agents? Do they work? Do antacids remain in the stomach for a short or a long period? The investigating device used was the Japanese-invented gastrocamera which permits intragastric photography of a high degree of definition. The camera was developed in Japan during the 1950's1 but not introduced clinically in the United States until 1963 and 1964.2,3 It consists of a small camera actually References 1. The Outline of a Gastrocamera, Japan Endoscopic Society, 1962. 2. Hara, Y., et al: Clinical Experience With the Gastrocamera , Ann Surg 159:452, 1964.Crossref 3. Morrissey, J.F.; Hara, Y.; and Perna, G.: The Value of the Japanese Gastrocamera for the Diagnosis of Gastric Pathology , Bull Gastroin Endose 10:6, 1964. 4. Hoon, J.R.: The Many Views of Gastrocamera , Industr Med Surg 34:67, 1965. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Observation of Antacids by Intragastric Photography

Archives of Surgery , Volume 93 (3) – Sep 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1966.01330030097020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract CURIOSITY concerning conflicting claims and the availability of a suitable investigating instrument led to this photographic study of gastric antacids. The observations here are photographic and not chemical, yet they constitute an attempt to add useful knowledge concerning the action of the tested drugs in a human stomach. The claims and questions are as follows. Do the antacids really coat an ulcer and the inflamed mucosa like a salve? Are liquid forms more efficient than tablet forms? What, if anything, is the significance of antifoaming agents? Do they work? Do antacids remain in the stomach for a short or a long period? The investigating device used was the Japanese-invented gastrocamera which permits intragastric photography of a high degree of definition. The camera was developed in Japan during the 1950's1 but not introduced clinically in the United States until 1963 and 1964.2,3 It consists of a small camera actually References 1. The Outline of a Gastrocamera, Japan Endoscopic Society, 1962. 2. Hara, Y., et al: Clinical Experience With the Gastrocamera , Ann Surg 159:452, 1964.Crossref 3. Morrissey, J.F.; Hara, Y.; and Perna, G.: The Value of the Japanese Gastrocamera for the Diagnosis of Gastric Pathology , Bull Gastroin Endose 10:6, 1964. 4. Hoon, J.R.: The Many Views of Gastrocamera , Industr Med Surg 34:67, 1965.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1966

References