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Obesity, Social Class, and Mental Illness

Obesity, Social Class, and Mental Illness The relationship between obesity and mental health was investigated, using data obtained from 1,660 persons selected as representative of 110,000 inhabitants of a residential area of New York City. In addition to confirming the previously noted relationship between obesity and age, preliminary analysis revealed a striking relationship between obesity and socioeconomic status of origin. The prevalence of obesity was 7 times higher among women reared in the lowest social class category as compared with those reared in the highest category. Scores made by the obese respondents on 9 mental health indices were compared with scores made by individuals of average weight. The obese respondents made more pathological scores on 8 of the 9 measures and on 3 of these the difference was statistically significant ("immaturity," "rigidity," and "suspiciousness"). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Obesity, Social Class, and Mental Illness

JAMA , Volume 181 (11) – Sep 15, 1962

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1962 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1962.03050370030007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship between obesity and mental health was investigated, using data obtained from 1,660 persons selected as representative of 110,000 inhabitants of a residential area of New York City. In addition to confirming the previously noted relationship between obesity and age, preliminary analysis revealed a striking relationship between obesity and socioeconomic status of origin. The prevalence of obesity was 7 times higher among women reared in the lowest social class category as compared with those reared in the highest category. Scores made by the obese respondents on 9 mental health indices were compared with scores made by individuals of average weight. The obese respondents made more pathological scores on 8 of the 9 measures and on 3 of these the difference was statistically significant ("immaturity," "rigidity," and "suspiciousness").

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 15, 1962

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