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Obesity Prevention in Pediatric Primary Care

Obesity Prevention in Pediatric Primary Care EDITORIAL Four Behaviors to Target ANY OF THOSE delivering primary care remain ducing television viewing decreases aggressive behavior paralyzed in their efforts to prevent child- in school-aged children. The current recommenda- M hood obesity. This may be because they real- tions are that children younger than 2 years watch no tele- ize that there are no interventions proven to prevent obe- vision and that those 2 years and older limit viewing to sity that can be employed in primary care settings and less than 2 hours per day. No time seems too early to because they wish to “do no harm.” Furthermore, they begin counseling parents about their child’s television acknowledge that most newborns will not become obese viewing. Children have substantial exposure to televi- during childhood or young adulthood, even if no efforts sion early in life, and recent evidence shows that even 1 10 are made by primary care providers to prevent obesity. infant behavior is affected by television viewing. At the same time, there is a growing sense of frustration about doing nothing because obesity is now twice as com- Encourage Outdoor Play mon as it was 20 years ago and new evidence constantly emerges about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Obesity Prevention in Pediatric Primary Care

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 157 (8) – Aug 1, 2003

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2003 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.157.8.725
pmid
12912775
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL Four Behaviors to Target ANY OF THOSE delivering primary care remain ducing television viewing decreases aggressive behavior paralyzed in their efforts to prevent child- in school-aged children. The current recommenda- M hood obesity. This may be because they real- tions are that children younger than 2 years watch no tele- ize that there are no interventions proven to prevent obe- vision and that those 2 years and older limit viewing to sity that can be employed in primary care settings and less than 2 hours per day. No time seems too early to because they wish to “do no harm.” Furthermore, they begin counseling parents about their child’s television acknowledge that most newborns will not become obese viewing. Children have substantial exposure to televi- during childhood or young adulthood, even if no efforts sion early in life, and recent evidence shows that even 1 10 are made by primary care providers to prevent obesity. infant behavior is affected by television viewing. At the same time, there is a growing sense of frustration about doing nothing because obesity is now twice as com- Encourage Outdoor Play mon as it was 20 years ago and new evidence constantly emerges about

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 2003

References