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Nummular Purpura

Nummular Purpura Abstract To the Editor— Coin rubbing, or ca̧o gío', is a common practice in Vietnam and among Vietnamese immigrants1,2 as a folk remedy for fever, headaches, and other symptoms, mainly in children.2 Oil is first massaged onto the back and chest, and the skin is stroked with the edge of a coin vertically and/or along the ribs, until purpura appears.2 We recently had the opportunity to observe this condition (Figure). A fever is supposed to break when the purpura resolves. Copper coins, it is claimed, are most effective.The reports of coin rubbing have appeared in the pediatric literature, where it has been called pseudobattering to distinguish the linear purpura from true child abuse.1,2 Rasmussen3 mentioned coin rubbing in his recent review of "puzzling purpuras" in children. The condition is onlyLinear purpura from coin rubbing. likely to be seen incidentally by a dermatologist, however, as References 1. Gellis SS, Feingold M, Yeatman GW, et al: Pseudobattering in Vietnamese children . AJDC 1976;130:857-858. 2. Yeatman GW, Shaw C, Barlow MJ, et al: Pseudobattering in Vietnamese children . Pediatrics 1976;58:616-618. 3. Rasmussen JE: Puzzling purpuras in children and young adults . J Am Acad Dermatol 1982;6:67-72.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1985.01660030029012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor— Coin rubbing, or ca̧o gío', is a common practice in Vietnam and among Vietnamese immigrants1,2 as a folk remedy for fever, headaches, and other symptoms, mainly in children.2 Oil is first massaged onto the back and chest, and the skin is stroked with the edge of a coin vertically and/or along the ribs, until purpura appears.2 We recently had the opportunity to observe this condition (Figure). A fever is supposed to break when the purpura resolves. Copper coins, it is claimed, are most effective.The reports of coin rubbing have appeared in the pediatric literature, where it has been called pseudobattering to distinguish the linear purpura from true child abuse.1,2 Rasmussen3 mentioned coin rubbing in his recent review of "puzzling purpuras" in children. The condition is onlyLinear purpura from coin rubbing. likely to be seen incidentally by a dermatologist, however, as References 1. Gellis SS, Feingold M, Yeatman GW, et al: Pseudobattering in Vietnamese children . AJDC 1976;130:857-858. 2. Yeatman GW, Shaw C, Barlow MJ, et al: Pseudobattering in Vietnamese children . Pediatrics 1976;58:616-618. 3. Rasmussen JE: Puzzling purpuras in children and young adults . J Am Acad Dermatol 1982;6:67-72.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1985

References