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Not All Weight Loss Created Equal

Not All Weight Loss Created Equal Not All Weight Loss Created Equal Invited Commentary Invited Commentary Brian Hodgens, MD; Kenric M. Murayama, MD While we know that bariatric surgery is the most effective treat- patients, 87%; white patients, 90%) and overall satisfaction ment for obesity, there are well-documented disparities be- with surgery (black patients, 78%; white patients, 84%), tween ethnic and income groups with regards to access and out- these questions begin to address issues that are difficult to comes. Most studies agree that when comparing black patients study: cultural attitudes toward medicine and weight loss. with white patients, black Importantly, the authors have identified some concerning patients have higher rates of race-associated differences in patients undergoing bariatric Related article complications and hospital surgery, with lower 1-year follow-up rates, lower mean utilization, with decreased resolution of comorbidities. Whether weight loss, and lower percentage of total weight loss in this is associated with genetics, socioeconomic factors, cul- black patients. Also important to consider is overall cul- tural differences, types of procedure performed, clinician bias, tural perception of weight and identity. Black men in par- and/or insurer bias remains to be determined. ticular undergo fewer bariatric surgeries than their white To answer these questions, studies such as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Surgery American Medical Association

Not All Weight Loss Created Equal

JAMA Surgery , Volume 154 (5) – May 6, 2019

Not All Weight Loss Created Equal

Abstract

Not All Weight Loss Created Equal Invited Commentary Invited Commentary Brian Hodgens, MD; Kenric M. Murayama, MD While we know that bariatric surgery is the most effective treat- patients, 87%; white patients, 90%) and overall satisfaction ment for obesity, there are well-documented disparities be- with surgery (black patients, 78%; white patients, 84%), tween ethnic and income groups with regards to access and out- these questions begin to address issues that are difficult to comes. Most...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6254
eISSN
2168-6262
DOI
10.1001/jamasurg.2019.0067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Not All Weight Loss Created Equal Invited Commentary Invited Commentary Brian Hodgens, MD; Kenric M. Murayama, MD While we know that bariatric surgery is the most effective treat- patients, 87%; white patients, 90%) and overall satisfaction ment for obesity, there are well-documented disparities be- with surgery (black patients, 78%; white patients, 84%), tween ethnic and income groups with regards to access and out- these questions begin to address issues that are difficult to comes. Most studies agree that when comparing black patients study: cultural attitudes toward medicine and weight loss. with white patients, black Importantly, the authors have identified some concerning patients have higher rates of race-associated differences in patients undergoing bariatric Related article complications and hospital surgery, with lower 1-year follow-up rates, lower mean utilization, with decreased resolution of comorbidities. Whether weight loss, and lower percentage of total weight loss in this is associated with genetics, socioeconomic factors, cul- black patients. Also important to consider is overall cul- tural differences, types of procedure performed, clinician bias, tural perception of weight and identity. Black men in par- and/or insurer bias remains to be determined. ticular undergo fewer bariatric surgeries than their white To answer these questions, studies such as

Journal

JAMA SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 6, 2019

References