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Nonfat Dry Milk Helps Prevent Formaldehyde Dermatitis

Nonfat Dry Milk Helps Prevent Formaldehyde Dermatitis This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor.— Formaldehyde present in clothing and sheets can produce allergic reactions. Most frequently, it is an irritant, especially to dry skin and areas exposed to increased friction or perspiration.Casein is an innocuous compound that, when added to formaldehyde, produces insoluble compounds used to make items, such as buttons, billiard balls, and water-proof adhesives. A small handful of nonfat dry milk added to the laundry rinse water precipitates free formaldehyde, this results in reduction of the skin irritation. This process also makes clothing and sheets feel softer. In some fabrics, the formaldehyde continues to be released, and after a few days the rinsing must be repeated.Excessive quantities of harsh laundry detergents may cause the same problem of itching. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Nonfat Dry Milk Helps Prevent Formaldehyde Dermatitis

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 110 (2) – Aug 1, 1974

Nonfat Dry Milk Helps Prevent Formaldehyde Dermatitis

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor.— Formaldehyde present in clothing and sheets can produce allergic reactions. Most frequently, it is an irritant, especially to dry skin and areas exposed to increased friction or perspiration.Casein is an innocuous compound that, when added to formaldehyde, produces insoluble compounds used to make items, such as buttons, billiard...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1974.01630080087040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor.— Formaldehyde present in clothing and sheets can produce allergic reactions. Most frequently, it is an irritant, especially to dry skin and areas exposed to increased friction or perspiration.Casein is an innocuous compound that, when added to formaldehyde, produces insoluble compounds used to make items, such as buttons, billiard balls, and water-proof adhesives. A small handful of nonfat dry milk added to the laundry rinse water precipitates free formaldehyde, this results in reduction of the skin irritation. This process also makes clothing and sheets feel softer. In some fabrics, the formaldehyde continues to be released, and after a few days the rinsing must be repeated.Excessive quantities of harsh laundry detergents may cause the same problem of itching.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1974

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