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Nifedipine in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

Nifedipine in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Abstract To the Editor. —Nifedipine is a calcium channel-blocking agent that is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of ischemic heart disease and hypertension.1-3 Since these are common problems in patients receiving dialysis, it may be anticipated that many such patients will be treated with this drug. We recently saw a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) who had been taking 20 mg of nifedipine four times a day for angina, but were unable to find any published data concerning the use of this drug in this setting. To determine if any dosage modification is necessary, we measured plasma levels and drug removal by peritoneal dialysis.The patient was studied in our CAPD Unit, where multiple dialysis exchanges were performed. Peritoneal fluid samples were collected from the dialysate effluent at the completion of each drainage (time intervals given in the Table) and sent to a laboratory (Pfizer References 1. Stone PE, Antman EM, Muller JE, et al: Calcium channel blocking agents in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders: II. Hemodynamic effects and clinical applications. Ann Intern Med 1980;93:886-904.Crossref 2. Zelis R, Flaim SF: Calcium blocking drugs for angina pectoris. Ann Rev Med 1982;33:465-478.Crossref 3. Iaina A, Eliahou HE: From beta blockers to CA2+ blockers in hypertension: A review. Isr J Med Sci 1982;18:735-739. 4. McAllister RG: Clinical pharmacology of slow channel blocking agents. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 1982;25:83-102.Crossref 5. Henry PD: Comparative pharmacology of calcium antagonists: Nifedipine, verapamil and diltiazem. Am J Cardiol 1980;46:1047-1058.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Nifedipine in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

Nifedipine in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —Nifedipine is a calcium channel-blocking agent that is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of ischemic heart disease and hypertension.1-3 Since these are common problems in patients receiving dialysis, it may be anticipated that many such patients will be treated with this drug. We recently saw a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) who had been taking 20 mg of nifedipine four times a day for angina, but were unable to...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1983.00350100209055
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —Nifedipine is a calcium channel-blocking agent that is being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of ischemic heart disease and hypertension.1-3 Since these are common problems in patients receiving dialysis, it may be anticipated that many such patients will be treated with this drug. We recently saw a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) who had been taking 20 mg of nifedipine four times a day for angina, but were unable to find any published data concerning the use of this drug in this setting. To determine if any dosage modification is necessary, we measured plasma levels and drug removal by peritoneal dialysis.The patient was studied in our CAPD Unit, where multiple dialysis exchanges were performed. Peritoneal fluid samples were collected from the dialysate effluent at the completion of each drainage (time intervals given in the Table) and sent to a laboratory (Pfizer References 1. Stone PE, Antman EM, Muller JE, et al: Calcium channel blocking agents in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders: II. Hemodynamic effects and clinical applications. Ann Intern Med 1980;93:886-904.Crossref 2. Zelis R, Flaim SF: Calcium blocking drugs for angina pectoris. Ann Rev Med 1982;33:465-478.Crossref 3. Iaina A, Eliahou HE: From beta blockers to CA2+ blockers in hypertension: A review. Isr J Med Sci 1982;18:735-739. 4. McAllister RG: Clinical pharmacology of slow channel blocking agents. Prog Cardiovasc Dis 1982;25:83-102.Crossref 5. Henry PD: Comparative pharmacology of calcium antagonists: Nifedipine, verapamil and diltiazem. Am J Cardiol 1980;46:1047-1058.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1983

References