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NEW TREATMENT FOR CALCIFIC CORNEAL OPACITIES

NEW TREATMENT FOR CALCIFIC CORNEAL OPACITIES Abstract IN THIS paper a clinically useful method for dissolving calcific corneal opacities by means of a solution of the neutral sodium salt of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid is reported. Treatment with a solution of this material is appropriate for corneal opacities which consist of calcific deposits in the anterior layers of the stroma or in the epithelium. This type of corneal opacity may be exogenous, resulting from a lime burn, or may be endogenous in the band keratopathies associated with protracted uveitis, hypercalcemia, or phthisis bulbi. No effect from treatment with this solution is to be expected in opacities which are noncalcific, such as result from edema, infiltration with inflammatory cells, scarring, or vascularization.1 The purpose of treatment for removal of calcific corneal opacities may be to improve vision when the opacities are axially situated or to relieve discomfort when calcific particles are being spontaneously extruded through the corneal epithelium. References 1. Some clearing effect would be expected in corneal opacities due to other metallic elements, e. g., barium and lead; but no actual investigation of these has yet been made. Initial trials on corneal rust rings from steel or iron foreign bodies have been disappointing. 2. These commercial preparations are much more concentrated and much more alkaline than the solution to be recommended for treatment of the cornea. 3. This solution may be prepared from analytical-grade disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate dihydrate (also called "disodium versenate"), obtainable from the Bersworth Chemical Co., Framingham, Mass. The solution is prepared by dissolving 0.37 gm. of this compound in 100 ml. of distilled water and adding 0.10 gm. of sodium bicarbonate. Sterilization is accomplished by autoclaving or boiling. 4. Grant, W. M.: Chemical Burns of the Eye: Emergency Treatment , M. Clin. North America 36:1215, 1952. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

NEW TREATMENT FOR CALCIFIC CORNEAL OPACITIES

A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 48 (6) – Dec 1, 1952

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010693002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract IN THIS paper a clinically useful method for dissolving calcific corneal opacities by means of a solution of the neutral sodium salt of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid is reported. Treatment with a solution of this material is appropriate for corneal opacities which consist of calcific deposits in the anterior layers of the stroma or in the epithelium. This type of corneal opacity may be exogenous, resulting from a lime burn, or may be endogenous in the band keratopathies associated with protracted uveitis, hypercalcemia, or phthisis bulbi. No effect from treatment with this solution is to be expected in opacities which are noncalcific, such as result from edema, infiltration with inflammatory cells, scarring, or vascularization.1 The purpose of treatment for removal of calcific corneal opacities may be to improve vision when the opacities are axially situated or to relieve discomfort when calcific particles are being spontaneously extruded through the corneal epithelium. References 1. Some clearing effect would be expected in corneal opacities due to other metallic elements, e. g., barium and lead; but no actual investigation of these has yet been made. Initial trials on corneal rust rings from steel or iron foreign bodies have been disappointing. 2. These commercial preparations are much more concentrated and much more alkaline than the solution to be recommended for treatment of the cornea. 3. This solution may be prepared from analytical-grade disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate dihydrate (also called "disodium versenate"), obtainable from the Bersworth Chemical Co., Framingham, Mass. The solution is prepared by dissolving 0.37 gm. of this compound in 100 ml. of distilled water and adding 0.10 gm. of sodium bicarbonate. Sterilization is accomplished by autoclaving or boiling. 4. Grant, W. M.: Chemical Burns of the Eye: Emergency Treatment , M. Clin. North America 36:1215, 1952.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1952

References

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