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New Appliance

New Appliance A FRAME FOR EXAMINING EYE SKIAGRAMS. G. H. STOVER, M.D. Lecturer on Electrotherapeutics and Radiology, Denver and Gross Medical College; Radiologist to St. Joseph's and to the City and County Hospitals. DENVER. As I am frequently called on to make eye examinations and to localize foreign bodies in the eyeball, I found it necessary to devise some convenient method of holding the negatives made after the Sweet method, which would leave both hands free for using the instruments, and for making measurements, and which at the same time would give a good illumination; so I made the frame which is here illustrated. It is made of three-eighth inch poplar and is varnished to prevent warping. The plate holder is set at an angle of about 45 degrees with the base, and the opening in it, of just the size to take a 4x5 negative, is rabbeted at the sides to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

New Appliance

JAMA , Volume XLIV (13) – Apr 1, 1905

New Appliance

Abstract



A FRAME FOR EXAMINING EYE SKIAGRAMS.
G. H. STOVER, M.D.
Lecturer on Electrotherapeutics and Radiology, Denver and Gross Medical College; Radiologist to St. Joseph's and to the City and County Hospitals.
DENVER.
As I am frequently called on to make eye examinations and to localize foreign bodies in the eyeball, I found it necessary to devise some convenient method of holding the negatives made after the Sweet method, which would...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02500400039004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A FRAME FOR EXAMINING EYE SKIAGRAMS. G. H. STOVER, M.D. Lecturer on Electrotherapeutics and Radiology, Denver and Gross Medical College; Radiologist to St. Joseph's and to the City and County Hospitals. DENVER. As I am frequently called on to make eye examinations and to localize foreign bodies in the eyeball, I found it necessary to devise some convenient method of holding the negatives made after the Sweet method, which would leave both hands free for using the instruments, and for making measurements, and which at the same time would give a good illumination; so I made the frame which is here illustrated. It is made of three-eighth inch poplar and is varnished to prevent warping. The plate holder is set at an angle of about 45 degrees with the base, and the opening in it, of just the size to take a 4x5 negative, is rabbeted at the sides to

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1905

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