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Neurotoxicity, Neuroplasticity, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Morphometry

Neurotoxicity, Neuroplasticity, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Morphometry PERSPECTIVES Neurotoxicity, Neuroplasticity, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Morphometry What Is Happening in the Schizophrenic Brain? Daniel R. Weinberger, MD; Robert K. McClure, MD n an era of dramatic discoveries in neuroscience and genetics, it is likely that many popular theories and formulations about mental illness will need to be revised, if not discarded. The “neurodevelopmental hypothesis” is one of the popular theories about the origins of schizo- I phrenia, which posits that abnormalities of early brain development increase risk for the 1-3 subsequent emergence of the clinical syndrome. An early piece of evidence in support of this hypothesis was the apparent lack of progression of cerebral ventricular enlargement observed with 4-9 computed tomography during illness. An important assumption of the neurodevelopmental hy- pothesis is that the putative primary pathologic condition of the brain is a reflection of abnormali- ties of early development. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis thus assumes that developmental neuropathologic conditions should arrest early in life and not continue to progress. The com- puted tomography results showing no apparent progression seemed consistent with this assump- tion. However, a recent series of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies has called into ques- tion this assumption, by revealing changes in measurements of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

Neurotoxicity, Neuroplasticity, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Morphometry

JAMA Psychiatry , Volume 59 (6) – Jun 1, 2002

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2002 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.59.6.553
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PERSPECTIVES Neurotoxicity, Neuroplasticity, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Morphometry What Is Happening in the Schizophrenic Brain? Daniel R. Weinberger, MD; Robert K. McClure, MD n an era of dramatic discoveries in neuroscience and genetics, it is likely that many popular theories and formulations about mental illness will need to be revised, if not discarded. The “neurodevelopmental hypothesis” is one of the popular theories about the origins of schizo- I phrenia, which posits that abnormalities of early brain development increase risk for the 1-3 subsequent emergence of the clinical syndrome. An early piece of evidence in support of this hypothesis was the apparent lack of progression of cerebral ventricular enlargement observed with 4-9 computed tomography during illness. An important assumption of the neurodevelopmental hy- pothesis is that the putative primary pathologic condition of the brain is a reflection of abnormali- ties of early development. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis thus assumes that developmental neuropathologic conditions should arrest early in life and not continue to progress. The com- puted tomography results showing no apparent progression seemed consistent with this assump- tion. However, a recent series of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies has called into ques- tion this assumption, by revealing changes in measurements of

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 2002

References