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Negroes for Medicine

Negroes for Medicine Negroes constitute 11.4% of the population of the United States, but only 2.2% of the nation's physicians are Negroes. They represent one of the large untapped sources of personnel for medicine. In 1975, when the new medical schools presently being developed are in full operation, we will have openings for more than 2,500 additional first-year medical students. It is quite probable that by 1975 public demand for more physicians will make this estimate obsolete. Beyond the need for more applicants to medical school lies the obligation to educate a significantly greater number of Negroes for careers in medicine and in the other health professions. Today every medical school in the United States will accept qualified Negro applicants; in fact many schools are searching for them. Many admissions officers are suddenly asking "Where are qualified Negro applicants?" The almost total absence of these applicants reflects problems stretching back through college to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Negroes for Medicine

JAMA , Volume 202 (3) – Oct 16, 1967

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1967.03130160087018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Negroes constitute 11.4% of the population of the United States, but only 2.2% of the nation's physicians are Negroes. They represent one of the large untapped sources of personnel for medicine. In 1975, when the new medical schools presently being developed are in full operation, we will have openings for more than 2,500 additional first-year medical students. It is quite probable that by 1975 public demand for more physicians will make this estimate obsolete. Beyond the need for more applicants to medical school lies the obligation to educate a significantly greater number of Negroes for careers in medicine and in the other health professions. Today every medical school in the United States will accept qualified Negro applicants; in fact many schools are searching for them. Many admissions officers are suddenly asking "Where are qualified Negro applicants?" The almost total absence of these applicants reflects problems stretching back through college to

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 16, 1967

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