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NECROPSY FINDINGS IN NEW-BORN INFANTS

NECROPSY FINDINGS IN NEW-BORN INFANTS Postmortem examinations and the correlation of the findings with clinical phenomena have played a most important rôle in the progress and development of medical science. But only too often the interest in necropsies does not include those performed on new-born infants; instead, deaths in infancy occupy a place similar to the tonsil or appendix in the tissue laboratory, i. e., not examined except under some very important or unusual conditions. In a previous report1 I published a survey of routine necropsies performed on new-born infants dying at the University Hospital over a period of three years—a series of thirty-six—in which survey special attention was devoted to the incidence of cerebral hemorrhage. So much interest has been aroused concerning other causes of death that another and more general study from that point of view has seemed advisable. Consequently, a survey of the results obtained in the postmortem examination of infants http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

NECROPSY FINDINGS IN NEW-BORN INFANTS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1921.01910350075010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Postmortem examinations and the correlation of the findings with clinical phenomena have played a most important rôle in the progress and development of medical science. But only too often the interest in necropsies does not include those performed on new-born infants; instead, deaths in infancy occupy a place similar to the tonsil or appendix in the tissue laboratory, i. e., not examined except under some very important or unusual conditions. In a previous report1 I published a survey of routine necropsies performed on new-born infants dying at the University Hospital over a period of three years—a series of thirty-six—in which survey special attention was devoted to the incidence of cerebral hemorrhage. So much interest has been aroused concerning other causes of death that another and more general study from that point of view has seemed advisable. Consequently, a survey of the results obtained in the postmortem examination of infants

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1921

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