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NECROBIOSIS LIPOIDICA DIABETICORUM: ITS SURGICAL TREATMENT

NECROBIOSIS LIPOIDICA DIABETICORUM: ITS SURGICAL TREATMENT Abstract NECROBIOSIS lipoidica diabeticorum is practically always a therapeutic enigma. This paper describes a surgical method of treatment, the results of which suggest that it may be employed to advantage in severe and disabling cases of the disease. Originally believed to be a rare disorder, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum has been recognized with increasing frequency during recent years. Diabetes mellitus is found to be coexistent with it in 80 to 90 per cent of cases, but a sequential relationship has not been definitely established. More than 80 per cent of patients who have the disease are women.1 The lesions almost always occur on the shins, although they have also been encountered on the thighs, arms, abdomen, breasts and other parts of the cutaneous surface. Trauma appears to be an instigating factor in some cases of the disease, and the lesions frequently progress to the stage of ulceration after trauma.1 Both References 1. Hildebrand, A. G.; Montgomery, H., and Rynearson, E. H.: Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum , Arch. Int. Med. 66:851 ( (Oct.) ) 1940.Crossref 2. Lever, W. F.: Histopathology of the Skin , Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1949. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & Syphilology American Medical Association

NECROBIOSIS LIPOIDICA DIABETICORUM: ITS SURGICAL TREATMENT

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1951 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5979
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1951.01570060092009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract NECROBIOSIS lipoidica diabeticorum is practically always a therapeutic enigma. This paper describes a surgical method of treatment, the results of which suggest that it may be employed to advantage in severe and disabling cases of the disease. Originally believed to be a rare disorder, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum has been recognized with increasing frequency during recent years. Diabetes mellitus is found to be coexistent with it in 80 to 90 per cent of cases, but a sequential relationship has not been definitely established. More than 80 per cent of patients who have the disease are women.1 The lesions almost always occur on the shins, although they have also been encountered on the thighs, arms, abdomen, breasts and other parts of the cutaneous surface. Trauma appears to be an instigating factor in some cases of the disease, and the lesions frequently progress to the stage of ulceration after trauma.1 Both References 1. Hildebrand, A. G.; Montgomery, H., and Rynearson, E. H.: Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum , Arch. Int. Med. 66:851 ( (Oct.) ) 1940.Crossref 2. Lever, W. F.: Histopathology of the Skin , Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott Company, 1949.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1951

References