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Navigating the Challenges of In-flight Emergencies

Navigating the Challenges of In-flight Emergencies COMMENTARY ONLINE FIRST Navigating the Challenges of In-flight Emergencies Available evidence suggests there is significant room to Melissa L. P. Mattison, MD improve and standardize the care that is provided to Mark Zeidel, MD patients during in-flight medical emergencies. A survey of European airlines identified 10 000 in-flight medical S THE FLIGHT BEGINS ITS DESCENT, A CALL COMES emergencies during a 5-year period. The study noted over the intercom: “Is there a physician on that each airline had its own reporting system and proto- board?” Three internists traveling together to a col. Even though emergency medical kits are mandated Ameeting respond. A woman has lost conscious- to contain certain medications and equipment, the actual ness. She is incontinent and unresponsive, with a strong kits vary from airline to airline. The US Federal Aviation pulse and intermittent breathing. The physicians ulti- Administration (FAA) mandates that flight attendants mately determine the patient has hypoglycemia and a sei- receive training “to include performance drills, in the zure. It takes multiple requests before the flight attendants proper use of AEDs [automated external defibrillators] provide the physicians with the emergency medical kit. and in CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation] at least once When the kit arrives, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Navigating the Challenges of In-flight Emergencies

JAMA , Volume 305 (19) – May 18, 2011

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2011.618
pmid
21540410
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY ONLINE FIRST Navigating the Challenges of In-flight Emergencies Available evidence suggests there is significant room to Melissa L. P. Mattison, MD improve and standardize the care that is provided to Mark Zeidel, MD patients during in-flight medical emergencies. A survey of European airlines identified 10 000 in-flight medical S THE FLIGHT BEGINS ITS DESCENT, A CALL COMES emergencies during a 5-year period. The study noted over the intercom: “Is there a physician on that each airline had its own reporting system and proto- board?” Three internists traveling together to a col. Even though emergency medical kits are mandated Ameeting respond. A woman has lost conscious- to contain certain medications and equipment, the actual ness. She is incontinent and unresponsive, with a strong kits vary from airline to airline. The US Federal Aviation pulse and intermittent breathing. The physicians ulti- Administration (FAA) mandates that flight attendants mately determine the patient has hypoglycemia and a sei- receive training “to include performance drills, in the zure. It takes multiple requests before the flight attendants proper use of AEDs [automated external defibrillators] provide the physicians with the emergency medical kit. and in CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation] at least once When the kit arrives,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 18, 2011

References