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Natural vs Synthetic Vitamin E

Natural vs Synthetic Vitamin E To the Editor.— Dr. Ayers questioned (225:1124, 1973) Nagy's reply to the question of natural vs synthetic vitamins as being biologically equivalent. He referred to the difference in optical rotation of vitamin E derived from natural vs synthetic sources and their difference in potency on a milligram-for-milligram basis. Many substances that are identical chemically except for optical activity (dextro [d] vs levo [1] form) are not biologically equivalent. Further, there are a variety of officially recognized forms of vitamin E listed in the National Formulary: α-D or α-dextrolevo (DL) tocopherol, α-D or α-DL tocopheryl acetate, α-D or α-DL tocopheryl acid succinate, mixed tocopheryls concentrate, and α-D tocopheryl acetate concentrate. The concentrates are obtained from edible vegetable oils or from the by-products of their refining. The National Formulary (NF XIII) establishes appropriate standards of purity for each and requires vitamin E products to be labeled in terms of international units as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Natural vs Synthetic Vitamin E

JAMA , Volume 226 (6) – Nov 5, 1973

Natural vs Synthetic Vitamin E

Abstract



To the Editor.—
Dr. Ayers questioned (225:1124, 1973) Nagy's reply to the question of natural vs synthetic vitamins as being biologically equivalent. He referred to the difference in optical rotation of vitamin E derived from natural vs synthetic sources and their difference in potency on a milligram-for-milligram basis.
Many substances that are identical chemically except for optical activity (dextro [d] vs levo [1] form) are not biologically equivalent. Further, there are a...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1973.03230060048020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor.— Dr. Ayers questioned (225:1124, 1973) Nagy's reply to the question of natural vs synthetic vitamins as being biologically equivalent. He referred to the difference in optical rotation of vitamin E derived from natural vs synthetic sources and their difference in potency on a milligram-for-milligram basis. Many substances that are identical chemically except for optical activity (dextro [d] vs levo [1] form) are not biologically equivalent. Further, there are a variety of officially recognized forms of vitamin E listed in the National Formulary: α-D or α-dextrolevo (DL) tocopherol, α-D or α-DL tocopheryl acetate, α-D or α-DL tocopheryl acid succinate, mixed tocopheryls concentrate, and α-D tocopheryl acetate concentrate. The concentrates are obtained from edible vegetable oils or from the by-products of their refining. The National Formulary (NF XIII) establishes appropriate standards of purity for each and requires vitamin E products to be labeled in terms of international units as

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 5, 1973

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