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MYELOGENOUS CHLOROMA

MYELOGENOUS CHLOROMA The case herewith reported is of interest, first, because few instances of chloroma are published each year (only three in 1922), and, secondly, because the symptoms in this child all pointed to cerebral lesions and diverted the attention of the clinicians from the underlying condition. No superficial tumors were present, an unusual feature which further added to the difficulties of diagnosis, although the blood smears were typical of acute myelogenous leukemia. It is also interesting to note that the testis and epididymis were invaded by the tumor, these having been reported hitherto as being involved in only one instance.1 The diagnosis had been abdominal spasms, worms and poliomyelitis before admission to the Cincinnati General Hospital; after admission, it was a question whether the case should be considered lymphogenous chloroma or encephalitis with a severe anemia. Our knowledge of chloroma dates back to 1854, when it was first described by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1923 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1923.01920050042006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The case herewith reported is of interest, first, because few instances of chloroma are published each year (only three in 1922), and, secondly, because the symptoms in this child all pointed to cerebral lesions and diverted the attention of the clinicians from the underlying condition. No superficial tumors were present, an unusual feature which further added to the difficulties of diagnosis, although the blood smears were typical of acute myelogenous leukemia. It is also interesting to note that the testis and epididymis were invaded by the tumor, these having been reported hitherto as being involved in only one instance.1 The diagnosis had been abdominal spasms, worms and poliomyelitis before admission to the Cincinnati General Hospital; after admission, it was a question whether the case should be considered lymphogenous chloroma or encephalitis with a severe anemia. Our knowledge of chloroma dates back to 1854, when it was first described by

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1923

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