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MYCOTIC ENDOCARDITIS DUE TO CANDIDA ALBICANS

MYCOTIC ENDOCARDITIS DUE TO CANDIDA ALBICANS During the past decade there has been an increasing interest manifested in systemic fungus disease as evidenced by the large number of reports in the literature. Actinomycosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, torulosis, moniliasis, sporotrichosis, and aspergillosis represent a group of mycotic diseases that occur in the United States and that may become disseminated, often terminating fatally.1 However, endocarditis due to fungi is exceedingly rare2 and, to the best of our knowledge, has not been described in infancy and has been reported only once in a child under 15 years of age.3 Twenty-four cases of mycotic endocarditis have been found in the literature.4 Among these, the organism was identified in 19 instances. In four cases an unidentified fungus was present, and in one case a fungus was identified in a blood culture but no autopsy was performed. In nine of the 24 cases, the disease was caused by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

MYCOTIC ENDOCARDITIS DUE TO CANDIDA ALBICANS

JAMA , Volume 149 (9) – Jun 28, 1952

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1952.72930260004009b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the past decade there has been an increasing interest manifested in systemic fungus disease as evidenced by the large number of reports in the literature. Actinomycosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, torulosis, moniliasis, sporotrichosis, and aspergillosis represent a group of mycotic diseases that occur in the United States and that may become disseminated, often terminating fatally.1 However, endocarditis due to fungi is exceedingly rare2 and, to the best of our knowledge, has not been described in infancy and has been reported only once in a child under 15 years of age.3 Twenty-four cases of mycotic endocarditis have been found in the literature.4 Among these, the organism was identified in 19 instances. In four cases an unidentified fungus was present, and in one case a fungus was identified in a blood culture but no autopsy was performed. In nine of the 24 cases, the disease was caused by

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 28, 1952

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