Moving From Child Advocacy to Evidence-Based Care for Digital Natives

Moving From Child Advocacy to Evidence-Based Care for Digital Natives Opinion EDITORIAL Moving From Child Advocacy to Evidence-Based Care for Digital Natives Michael Rich, MD, MPH 1,2 3 4 Pediatricians, psychologists, and otherhealth professionals Findings reported in this issue can help pediatricians, par- have long cautioned about the physical and mental health ef- ents, educators, and others who care for children to move be- fects of children’s media use. Parents have also been con- yond opinion to consciously guide children’s media use to- cerned; however, on the whole, they have been slow to re- ward healthy outcomes. The remarkable consistency of spond to potential risks. The immediate practical advantages findings from Australia, China, Singapore, 8 different Euro- and believed educational benefits of entertaining children with pean countries, and the United States demonstrates that links screen media often override any long-term harm that many feel between media exposure and children’s developmental and does not apply to their children. health outcomes are universal; media have globalized the psy- Parents rely on the expertise of child development and chosocial environments in which children are growing up. Test- health professionals to guide their child-rearing decisions. Pe- ing long-standing empirical concerns among a cohort of Eu- diatricians deserve credit for voicing early concern about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Moving From Child Advocacy to Evidence-Based Care for Digital Natives

JAMA Pediatrics, Volume 168 (5) – May 1, 2014

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.55
pmid
24687218
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Moving From Child Advocacy to Evidence-Based Care for Digital Natives Michael Rich, MD, MPH 1,2 3 4 Pediatricians, psychologists, and otherhealth professionals Findings reported in this issue can help pediatricians, par- have long cautioned about the physical and mental health ef- ents, educators, and others who care for children to move be- fects of children’s media use. Parents have also been con- yond opinion to consciously guide children’s media use to- cerned; however, on the whole, they have been slow to re- ward healthy outcomes. The remarkable consistency of spond to potential risks. The immediate practical advantages findings from Australia, China, Singapore, 8 different Euro- and believed educational benefits of entertaining children with pean countries, and the United States demonstrates that links screen media often override any long-term harm that many feel between media exposure and children’s developmental and does not apply to their children. health outcomes are universal; media have globalized the psy- Parents rely on the expertise of child development and chosocial environments in which children are growing up. Test- health professionals to guide their child-rearing decisions. Pe- ing long-standing empirical concerns among a cohort of Eu- diatricians deserve credit for voicing early concern about

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 2014

References

  • Risk-taking and the media.
    Fischer, P; Vingilis, E; Greitemeyer, T; Vogrincic, C

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