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MOVABLE KIDNEY.

MOVABLE KIDNEY. Further interest in this subject is aroused by a recent contribution from Mr. Treves in which he facetiously questions the existence of this lesion, but immediately suggests a treatment by means of a complicated double-spring truss which, he says, must be delicately adjusted. It is well understood that the kidney, normally, has a certain range of motion; it is generally admitted that the degree of mobility varies considerably and that it may attain a position easily palpable yet may not cause pathologic changes; it is an accepted fact that its ptosis is sometimes but a part of Glenard's disease; but faithful observers of the anatomy and the pathology that is seen within the abdomen in repeated explorations recognize the additional and—clinically speaking—the rather more important fact that the kidney may attain such a degree of mobility as primarily and seriously to act as an impediment to health and that in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

MOVABLE KIDNEY.

JAMA , Volume XLV (1) – Jul 1, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.52510010031001h
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Further interest in this subject is aroused by a recent contribution from Mr. Treves in which he facetiously questions the existence of this lesion, but immediately suggests a treatment by means of a complicated double-spring truss which, he says, must be delicately adjusted. It is well understood that the kidney, normally, has a certain range of motion; it is generally admitted that the degree of mobility varies considerably and that it may attain a position easily palpable yet may not cause pathologic changes; it is an accepted fact that its ptosis is sometimes but a part of Glenard's disease; but faithful observers of the anatomy and the pathology that is seen within the abdomen in repeated explorations recognize the additional and—clinically speaking—the rather more important fact that the kidney may attain such a degree of mobility as primarily and seriously to act as an impediment to health and that in

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1905

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