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MOTILITY OF THE EMPTY STOMACH IN NORMAL AND IN MALNOURISHED ASTHENIC CHILDREN

MOTILITY OF THE EMPTY STOMACH IN NORMAL AND IN MALNOURISHED ASTHENIC CHILDREN Most investigators who have studied gastric motility in children have made use of the methods of gastric expression and roentgen examination chiefly for the determination of the emptying time of the digesting stomach. Such studies are limited by the fact that the examinations are brief and are made only at certain intervals, so that it is impossible to obtain a continuous record of gastric activity. As the activity of the stomach is somewhat variable, it was thought that a continuous examination over an extended period of time might yield valuable information with regard to the inherent power of the gastric musculature under certain conditions. The present problem is concerned with the motility of the empty stomach in normal children, and in those who are of the asthenic body habitus and in a malnourished condition, being underweight for the age and height. This preliminary report includes a study of five normal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

MOTILITY OF THE EMPTY STOMACH IN NORMAL AND IN MALNOURISHED ASTHENIC CHILDREN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1930.01930140003001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most investigators who have studied gastric motility in children have made use of the methods of gastric expression and roentgen examination chiefly for the determination of the emptying time of the digesting stomach. Such studies are limited by the fact that the examinations are brief and are made only at certain intervals, so that it is impossible to obtain a continuous record of gastric activity. As the activity of the stomach is somewhat variable, it was thought that a continuous examination over an extended period of time might yield valuable information with regard to the inherent power of the gastric musculature under certain conditions. The present problem is concerned with the motility of the empty stomach in normal children, and in those who are of the asthenic body habitus and in a malnourished condition, being underweight for the age and height. This preliminary report includes a study of five normal

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1930

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