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Morphology of the Blood and Marrow in Clinical Practice.

Morphology of the Blood and Marrow in Clinical Practice. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract For optimal usefulness to the modern clinician, a book on blood and marrow cell morphology should include (1) techniques of obtaining, preparing, and examining cell materials; (2) high-fidelity illustrations with helpful and accurate descriptions; (3) correlation of anatomic features with pathophysiologic mechanisms; and (4) significance for diagnosis and therapy. This publication rates unevenly when measured against these criteria. The proper indications for marrow examination are not given. The author's account of technique for obtaining and preparing the cell material is personalized and confined to posterior iliac crest aspiration and Vim-Silverman needle biopsy. His loose use of the terms "aspiration," "spicule," "smear," and "squash" does not permit the reader to determine their similarities or distinctions. Laudable emphasis is given to the importance and role of histologic preparations. However, the writer does not refer to the substantial superiority of the hematoxylin-eosin azure staining method of Maximow and Block over the traditional pathologist's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Morphology of the Blood and Marrow in Clinical Practice.

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 129 (3) – Mar 1, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.00320030125024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract For optimal usefulness to the modern clinician, a book on blood and marrow cell morphology should include (1) techniques of obtaining, preparing, and examining cell materials; (2) high-fidelity illustrations with helpful and accurate descriptions; (3) correlation of anatomic features with pathophysiologic mechanisms; and (4) significance for diagnosis and therapy. This publication rates unevenly when measured against these criteria. The proper indications for marrow examination are not given. The author's account of technique for obtaining and preparing the cell material is personalized and confined to posterior iliac crest aspiration and Vim-Silverman needle biopsy. His loose use of the terms "aspiration," "spicule," "smear," and "squash" does not permit the reader to determine their similarities or distinctions. Laudable emphasis is given to the importance and role of histologic preparations. However, the writer does not refer to the substantial superiority of the hematoxylin-eosin azure staining method of Maximow and Block over the traditional pathologist's

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1972

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