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More on Adenotonsillectomy-Reply

More on Adenotonsillectomy-Reply Abstract In Reply.—Dr Rosen's interesting historical anecdotes about adenotonsillectomy reflect both concern and uncertainty about the role of the tonsils in the maturation of the immune system. We do not disagree that the tonsils have an important role in immunity, but the evidence to date fails to disclose exactly what that role is. Retrospective studies such as those by D'Amelio et al1 do not prove that tonsillectomy lowers serum IgA—only that people who had tonsillectomy have slightly lower serum IgA (but have no demonstrated clinical disadvantage as a consequence). Not excluded is the distinct possibility that they had low secretory IgA preoperatively, hence their problem with recurrent throat infections that led to the tonsillectomy. In a prospective study of nearly 200 children with severe throat infection, there were no differences in secretory IgA levels or other measures of immune function preoperatively vs postoperatively or between those who underwent References 1. D'Amelio R, Palmisano L, Le Moli S, et al: Serum and salivary IgA in normal subjects: Comparison between tonsillectomized and nontonsillectomized subjects . Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 1982;68:256-259.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

More on Adenotonsillectomy-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.—Dr Rosen's interesting historical anecdotes about adenotonsillectomy reflect both concern and uncertainty about the role of the tonsils in the maturation of the immune system. We do not disagree that the tonsils have an important role in immunity, but the evidence to date fails to disclose exactly what that role is. Retrospective studies such as those by D'Amelio et al1 do not prove that tonsillectomy lowers serum IgA—only that people who had...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1986.03780120068023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.—Dr Rosen's interesting historical anecdotes about adenotonsillectomy reflect both concern and uncertainty about the role of the tonsils in the maturation of the immune system. We do not disagree that the tonsils have an important role in immunity, but the evidence to date fails to disclose exactly what that role is. Retrospective studies such as those by D'Amelio et al1 do not prove that tonsillectomy lowers serum IgA—only that people who had tonsillectomy have slightly lower serum IgA (but have no demonstrated clinical disadvantage as a consequence). Not excluded is the distinct possibility that they had low secretory IgA preoperatively, hence their problem with recurrent throat infections that led to the tonsillectomy. In a prospective study of nearly 200 children with severe throat infection, there were no differences in secretory IgA levels or other measures of immune function preoperatively vs postoperatively or between those who underwent References 1. D'Amelio R, Palmisano L, Le Moli S, et al: Serum and salivary IgA in normal subjects: Comparison between tonsillectomized and nontonsillectomized subjects . Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 1982;68:256-259.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1986

References