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Moral and Ethical Implications of Human Organ Transplants.

Moral and Ethical Implications of Human Organ Transplants. Abstract Morals and ethics of transplantation have received so much attention in the past few years that one wonders whether anything new can be said about them. One finds that very little can, or more properly, has. Yet this little volume has all the appurtenances of a more ambitious work—a foreword (by Dwight E. Harken, MD), preface, introduction, table of contents, reference notes at the end of each chapter, epilogue, bibliography, index, and even a few illustrations. The author is senior chaplain at the Baptist Hospital of Miami, Fla. Thus, it is no surprise that religiosity and biblical quotations stand out large. There is some factual material. The book springs from a dissertation written as a requirement for a doctorate in theology. The research involved not only a review of the literature (mostly journals, magazines, and newspapers) but also the solicitation of opinions and attitudes from hospital administrators and chaplains, ministers, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Moral and Ethical Implications of Human Organ Transplants.

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 130 (4) – Oct 1, 1972

Moral and Ethical Implications of Human Organ Transplants.

Abstract

Abstract Morals and ethics of transplantation have received so much attention in the past few years that one wonders whether anything new can be said about them. One finds that very little can, or more properly, has. Yet this little volume has all the appurtenances of a more ambitious work—a foreword (by Dwight E. Harken, MD), preface, introduction, table of contents, reference notes at the end of each chapter, epilogue, bibliography, index, and even a few illustrations. The author is...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.03650040173016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Morals and ethics of transplantation have received so much attention in the past few years that one wonders whether anything new can be said about them. One finds that very little can, or more properly, has. Yet this little volume has all the appurtenances of a more ambitious work—a foreword (by Dwight E. Harken, MD), preface, introduction, table of contents, reference notes at the end of each chapter, epilogue, bibliography, index, and even a few illustrations. The author is senior chaplain at the Baptist Hospital of Miami, Fla. Thus, it is no surprise that religiosity and biblical quotations stand out large. There is some factual material. The book springs from a dissertation written as a requirement for a doctorate in theology. The research involved not only a review of the literature (mostly journals, magazines, and newspapers) but also the solicitation of opinions and attitudes from hospital administrators and chaplains, ministers,

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1972

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