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MIXTURES OF FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS AS REFRIGERANT ANESTHETIC: A Hazard in Use in Surgical Skin Planing

MIXTURES OF FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS AS REFRIGERANT ANESTHETIC: A Hazard in Use in Surgical Skin... Abstract At the present stage of knowledge we believe it is necessary to warn against the use in surgical skin planing of the mixture of 57% dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12) and 43% dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon 114) as advocated recently.1 Unless it is employed with caution and in experienced hands, it is likely that congelational necrosis and sloughing will be produced, resulting in the loss of skin to an unpredictable depth, quite possibly exceeding that removed by the abrasion procedure itself. Subsequently it will be impossible to differentiate which of the two factors was actually responsible for whatever scarring occurs, and it is probable that the planing itself will be blamed for all. It is difficult to furnish a short communication giving adequate attention to all of the facts which we know to be pertinent to this question. Therefore only a few of our reasons will be given here. Since 1949 we References 1. Sternberg, A. S.: Fluorinated Hydrocarbon Compounds ("Freon") as a Refrigerant in Surgical Skin Planing , J. Invest. Dermat. 25:77 ( (Aug.) ) 1955.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

MIXTURES OF FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS AS REFRIGERANT ANESTHETIC: A Hazard in Use in Surgical Skin Planing

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550090084019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract At the present stage of knowledge we believe it is necessary to warn against the use in surgical skin planing of the mixture of 57% dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12) and 43% dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon 114) as advocated recently.1 Unless it is employed with caution and in experienced hands, it is likely that congelational necrosis and sloughing will be produced, resulting in the loss of skin to an unpredictable depth, quite possibly exceeding that removed by the abrasion procedure itself. Subsequently it will be impossible to differentiate which of the two factors was actually responsible for whatever scarring occurs, and it is probable that the planing itself will be blamed for all. It is difficult to furnish a short communication giving adequate attention to all of the facts which we know to be pertinent to this question. Therefore only a few of our reasons will be given here. Since 1949 we References 1. Sternberg, A. S.: Fluorinated Hydrocarbon Compounds ("Freon") as a Refrigerant in Surgical Skin Planing , J. Invest. Dermat. 25:77 ( (Aug.) ) 1955.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1956

References