Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall EDITORIAL Are We Prescribing the Right Psychotropic Medications to the Right Children Using the Right Treatment Plan? URING THE period (1987-1996) re- popular diagnosis). The data reflect somewhat higher uti- ported by Zito et al, researchers from lization rates for younger ages and possibly more seri- the field of child and adolescent psy- ous disorders in Medicaid populations, which could sup- chiatry and pediatrics conducted stud- port the hypothesis that mental illness in parents and the D ies to refine diagnostic criteria, applied stressors of poverty add to the prevalence of child and these criteria to determine the prevalence of child psy- adolescent psychiatric disorders in this subsample. An chiatric disorders, and provided the infrastructure for optimistic clinical perspective suggests that these data re- treatment studies. The research also led to greater stan- flect a broader awareness of diagnostic criteria, less ex- clusive reliance on “talking therapy,” and thoughtful ef- dardization of an “evaluation” that facilitated an expec- forts to extrapolate “off-label” from adult-based evidence tation that a formal diagnosis and treatment plan could to treat children and adolescents with serious mental be achieved in 1 or 2 hours. New medications emerged health needs. that were studied in adults http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 157 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/mirror-mirror-on-the-wall-dTZ31MSHTd
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2003 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.157.1.14
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL Are We Prescribing the Right Psychotropic Medications to the Right Children Using the Right Treatment Plan? URING THE period (1987-1996) re- popular diagnosis). The data reflect somewhat higher uti- ported by Zito et al, researchers from lization rates for younger ages and possibly more seri- the field of child and adolescent psy- ous disorders in Medicaid populations, which could sup- chiatry and pediatrics conducted stud- port the hypothesis that mental illness in parents and the D ies to refine diagnostic criteria, applied stressors of poverty add to the prevalence of child and these criteria to determine the prevalence of child psy- adolescent psychiatric disorders in this subsample. An chiatric disorders, and provided the infrastructure for optimistic clinical perspective suggests that these data re- treatment studies. The research also led to greater stan- flect a broader awareness of diagnostic criteria, less ex- clusive reliance on “talking therapy,” and thoughtful ef- dardization of an “evaluation” that facilitated an expec- forts to extrapolate “off-label” from adult-based evidence tation that a formal diagnosis and treatment plan could to treat children and adolescents with serious mental be achieved in 1 or 2 hours. New medications emerged health needs. that were studied in adults

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2003

References