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Mind-Body Program Helps Back Pain but Not Function

Mind-Body Program Helps Back Pain but Not Function Older adults with chronic lower back pain frequently suffer loss of physical function from unremitting pain and have limited pharmacologic treatment options. A recent randomized trial found that mindfulness meditation in adults 65 years and older with chronic lower back pain improved physical function in the short-term, but only reduced current and most severe pain in the longer-term (Morone NE et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176[3]:329-337). A recent study suggests meditation may relieve lower back pain in older adults. The study randomly assigned 282 older adults to a group intervention of 8 weekly 90-minute mindfulness meditation sessions where they learned 4 different meditation methods. The control group participated in an 8-week group health education program modeled on a curriculum for healthy aging, which did not include information on controlling pain. All participants subsequently received 6 monthly hour-long refresher sessions. Participants’ perceived functional limitation was measured on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). Pain intensity (current, mean, and most severe in the past week) was assessed with the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. By 8 weeks, the mind-body group had a clinically meaningful reduction of −3.4 points on the RMDQ compared with a −2.3 reduction for the control group. But by 6 months, 49.2% of the intervention group and 48.9% of the control group reported at least a 2.5-point improvement in perceived disability, suggesting functional improvement was not sustained in the intervention group. The lack of significant differences in perceived physical function between the 2 groups may be explained by low scores for depression for all participants and a high degree of mindfulness reported at baseline, according to the authors. The mind-body group did, however, sustain longer-term pain control with a clinically significantly 30% reduction in current and most severe pain for the past week during the 6-month follow-up compared with the control group. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Mind-Body Program Helps Back Pain but Not Function

JAMA , Volume 315 (16) – Apr 26, 2016

Mind-Body Program Helps Back Pain but Not Function

Abstract

Older adults with chronic lower back pain frequently suffer loss of physical function from unremitting pain and have limited pharmacologic treatment options. A recent randomized trial found that mindfulness meditation in adults 65 years and older with chronic lower back pain improved physical function in the short-term, but only reduced current and most severe pain in the longer-term (Morone NE et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176[3]:329-337). A recent study suggests meditation may relieve lower...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2016.3743
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Older adults with chronic lower back pain frequently suffer loss of physical function from unremitting pain and have limited pharmacologic treatment options. A recent randomized trial found that mindfulness meditation in adults 65 years and older with chronic lower back pain improved physical function in the short-term, but only reduced current and most severe pain in the longer-term (Morone NE et al. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176[3]:329-337). A recent study suggests meditation may relieve lower back pain in older adults. The study randomly assigned 282 older adults to a group intervention of 8 weekly 90-minute mindfulness meditation sessions where they learned 4 different meditation methods. The control group participated in an 8-week group health education program modeled on a curriculum for healthy aging, which did not include information on controlling pain. All participants subsequently received 6 monthly hour-long refresher sessions. Participants’ perceived functional limitation was measured on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). Pain intensity (current, mean, and most severe in the past week) was assessed with the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. By 8 weeks, the mind-body group had a clinically meaningful reduction of −3.4 points on the RMDQ compared with a −2.3 reduction for the control group. But by 6 months, 49.2% of the intervention group and 48.9% of the control group reported at least a 2.5-point improvement in perceived disability, suggesting functional improvement was not sustained in the intervention group. The lack of significant differences in perceived physical function between the 2 groups may be explained by low scores for depression for all participants and a high degree of mindfulness reported at baseline, according to the authors. The mind-body group did, however, sustain longer-term pain control with a clinically significantly 30% reduction in current and most severe pain for the past week during the 6-month follow-up compared with the control group.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 26, 2016

Keywords: back pain,meditation

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