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MILK-MIXTURES AS FOOD FOR INFANTS.

MILK-MIXTURES AS FOOD FOR INFANTS. The ideal nourishment for a child is mother's milk. Nature and nature's laws have wisely ordained that the child, whose digestion is unsuitable to the foods of matured years, should be provided with nourishment which in the nature of things is most simple and bears with it the vital ingredients necessary to the child's growth. When, by certain causes, the natural method of feeding the infant is interfered with, artificial means are at hand to become the substitute for the mother and bring to the child such food as is alike acceptable to its taste and digestion, and which will add to its growth, prevent disease, and assure it a healthy childhood. As the feeding by the mother or the "wet nurse" is called the "natural" method, so is the other, by reason of its application, entitled the "artificial" method of nourishing, and the sucklings so reared are termed "bottle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

MILK-MIXTURES AS FOOD FOR INFANTS.

JAMA , Volume XXXI (19) – Nov 5, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.92450190028002j
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ideal nourishment for a child is mother's milk. Nature and nature's laws have wisely ordained that the child, whose digestion is unsuitable to the foods of matured years, should be provided with nourishment which in the nature of things is most simple and bears with it the vital ingredients necessary to the child's growth. When, by certain causes, the natural method of feeding the infant is interfered with, artificial means are at hand to become the substitute for the mother and bring to the child such food as is alike acceptable to its taste and digestion, and which will add to its growth, prevent disease, and assure it a healthy childhood. As the feeding by the mother or the "wet nurse" is called the "natural" method, so is the other, by reason of its application, entitled the "artificial" method of nourishing, and the sucklings so reared are termed "bottle

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 5, 1898

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