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MIGRAINE WITH RECURRENT OCULOMOTOR PALSY.

MIGRAINE WITH RECURRENT OCULOMOTOR PALSY. The group of diseases comprehended in the designation of neuroses must be conceived to be dependent on changes in nervous structure as yet undemonstrable by present methods of investigation. There is a growing belief that aberration in function can not take place without alteration in structure—in fact, normal function must be referred to molecular changes in the cellular elements. In either instance the result is attributable to the reaction of sensitive structures to stimuli of varying degree and character. The problems opened by these and allied conceptions are almost illimitable, and we must look for their solution to the new physiological chemistry. One of the most interesting of the neuroses is migraine, which is by some considered the sensory analogue of epilepsy. Both diseases are paroxysmal or explosive, are as a rule unassociated with a gross lesion, may be preceded by an aura, be attended with hallucinations or perversions of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

MIGRAINE WITH RECURRENT OCULOMOTOR PALSY.

JAMA , Volume XXXV (15) – Oct 13, 1900

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.02460410036005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The group of diseases comprehended in the designation of neuroses must be conceived to be dependent on changes in nervous structure as yet undemonstrable by present methods of investigation. There is a growing belief that aberration in function can not take place without alteration in structure—in fact, normal function must be referred to molecular changes in the cellular elements. In either instance the result is attributable to the reaction of sensitive structures to stimuli of varying degree and character. The problems opened by these and allied conceptions are almost illimitable, and we must look for their solution to the new physiological chemistry. One of the most interesting of the neuroses is migraine, which is by some considered the sensory analogue of epilepsy. Both diseases are paroxysmal or explosive, are as a rule unassociated with a gross lesion, may be preceded by an aura, be attended with hallucinations or perversions of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 13, 1900

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