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METHOD FOR OBJECTIVE MEASURE OF DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRESS

METHOD FOR OBJECTIVE MEASURE OF DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRESS THE SLOW grower or child who does not measure up to his chronological age group with respect to one or more aspects of development has during recent years increasingly stimulated the interest of the clinician. From a state of affairs in which these so-called exceptional children were more or less neglected, a shift has taken place: Today, innumerable supportive measures have been introduced to help the physically or otherwise handicapped child to grow and develop. The habilitation movement has itself suffered some growing pains which stem not only from the practical problems of setting up adequate programs, but also from the difficulties involved in evaluating the child's progress. The outstanding need is for an objective measure which will indicate the extent to which special training or other help has contributed to the child's development. It seems that this need is beginning to be recognized by workers in the field who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

METHOD FOR OBJECTIVE MEASURE OF DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRESS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1952.02040070052005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE SLOW grower or child who does not measure up to his chronological age group with respect to one or more aspects of development has during recent years increasingly stimulated the interest of the clinician. From a state of affairs in which these so-called exceptional children were more or less neglected, a shift has taken place: Today, innumerable supportive measures have been introduced to help the physically or otherwise handicapped child to grow and develop. The habilitation movement has itself suffered some growing pains which stem not only from the practical problems of setting up adequate programs, but also from the difficulties involved in evaluating the child's progress. The outstanding need is for an objective measure which will indicate the extent to which special training or other help has contributed to the child's development. It seems that this need is beginning to be recognized by workers in the field who

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1952

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