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Metastatic Bronchogenic Carcinoma to the Temporal Bone

Metastatic Bronchogenic Carcinoma to the Temporal Bone The temporal bone is an unusual site of bronchogenic carcinoma metastases. The usual metastatic sites of bronchogenic epidermoid carcinoma are cancellous bone, brain, liver, adrenals, and kidneys. The first symptom of bronchogenic carcinoma may be overlooked until metastases occur. Metastatic tumors to the temporal bone from distant primary sites are by way of the arterial route. If the bone marrow is still present in the mastoid portion of the temporal bone, these metastatic cells may be filtered from the blood stream. Metastases are unknown in the pneumatized areas of the temporal bone. The rarity of temporal bone tumors, primary or metastatic, is emphasized by the isolated case reports and the relatively small series of these tumors that have been reported in the literature. Furstenberg1 estimated primary carcinoma of the temporal bone as 1:20,000 of all aural diseases. Figi and Hempstead2 reported 48 cases of malignant tumors of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngolog American Medical Association

Metastatic Bronchogenic Carcinoma to the Temporal Bone

Archives of Otolaryngolog , Volume 72 (1) – Jul 1, 1960

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0003-9977
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1960.00740010108019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The temporal bone is an unusual site of bronchogenic carcinoma metastases. The usual metastatic sites of bronchogenic epidermoid carcinoma are cancellous bone, brain, liver, adrenals, and kidneys. The first symptom of bronchogenic carcinoma may be overlooked until metastases occur. Metastatic tumors to the temporal bone from distant primary sites are by way of the arterial route. If the bone marrow is still present in the mastoid portion of the temporal bone, these metastatic cells may be filtered from the blood stream. Metastases are unknown in the pneumatized areas of the temporal bone. The rarity of temporal bone tumors, primary or metastatic, is emphasized by the isolated case reports and the relatively small series of these tumors that have been reported in the literature. Furstenberg1 estimated primary carcinoma of the temporal bone as 1:20,000 of all aural diseases. Figi and Hempstead2 reported 48 cases of malignant tumors of the

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1960

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