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Mesenteric Hematoma Suggests Rupture of Visceral Artery Aneurysm

Mesenteric Hematoma Suggests Rupture of Visceral Artery Aneurysm Abstract • A 61-year-old man with nonspecific abdominal pain appeared to have an intramesenteric hematoma by computed tomographic scan. He suffered catastrophic intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a mesenteric branch-artery aneurysm several days later. A mesenteric hematoma, which can be diagnosed noninvasively, suggests a bleeding visceral artery aneurysm, and such findings warrant angiography followed by abdominal exploration if the presence of a visceral artery aneurysm is confirmed. (Arch Surg 1984;119:863) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Mesenteric Hematoma Suggests Rupture of Visceral Artery Aneurysm

Archives of Surgery , Volume 119 (7) – Jul 1, 1984

Mesenteric Hematoma Suggests Rupture of Visceral Artery Aneurysm

Abstract

Abstract • A 61-year-old man with nonspecific abdominal pain appeared to have an intramesenteric hematoma by computed tomographic scan. He suffered catastrophic intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a mesenteric branch-artery aneurysm several days later. A mesenteric hematoma, which can be diagnosed noninvasively, suggests a bleeding visceral artery aneurysm, and such findings warrant angiography followed by abdominal exploration if the presence of a visceral artery aneurysm is confirmed....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1984.01390190099023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • A 61-year-old man with nonspecific abdominal pain appeared to have an intramesenteric hematoma by computed tomographic scan. He suffered catastrophic intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a mesenteric branch-artery aneurysm several days later. A mesenteric hematoma, which can be diagnosed noninvasively, suggests a bleeding visceral artery aneurysm, and such findings warrant angiography followed by abdominal exploration if the presence of a visceral artery aneurysm is confirmed. (Arch Surg 1984;119:863)

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1984

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