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MENINGOCOCCIC MENINGITIS

MENINGOCOCCIC MENINGITIS The present epidemic of meningitis in Indianapolis began in November, 1929. This report includes cases admitted to the Indianapolis City Hospital between Nov. 11, 1929, and April 1, 1930. One patient was received in November, 52 in December, 22 in January, 44 in February, and 25 in March. Less than ten other patients either died without treatment or were treated elsewhere. The epidemic is still in progress, cases being admitted at the rate of about fifteen a month. The disease at present appears to be less virulent than during the early months. Practically 90 per cent of the early cases were employees or relatives of employees in two departments of a large industrial concern. Later, however, contacts were from several other sources, and eventually a considerable number could not be traced. Eighty-eight patients were white and fifty-six were Negroes. During the early weeks of the epidemic, almost all patients were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

MENINGOCOCCIC MENINGITIS

JAMA , Volume 95 (11) – Sep 13, 1930

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1930 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1930.02720110012005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present epidemic of meningitis in Indianapolis began in November, 1929. This report includes cases admitted to the Indianapolis City Hospital between Nov. 11, 1929, and April 1, 1930. One patient was received in November, 52 in December, 22 in January, 44 in February, and 25 in March. Less than ten other patients either died without treatment or were treated elsewhere. The epidemic is still in progress, cases being admitted at the rate of about fifteen a month. The disease at present appears to be less virulent than during the early months. Practically 90 per cent of the early cases were employees or relatives of employees in two departments of a large industrial concern. Later, however, contacts were from several other sources, and eventually a considerable number could not be traced. Eighty-eight patients were white and fifty-six were Negroes. During the early weeks of the epidemic, almost all patients were

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 13, 1930

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