Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

MELANOMA CAUSED BY INDELIBLE PENCIL

MELANOMA CAUSED BY INDELIBLE PENCIL Abstract Aniline and its derivatives and coal tar, their natural mother substance, have demonstrated their ability to produce inflammatory and neoplastic reactions in the skin. In a special class in this category of cutaneous reactions are those in which the skin and adjacent subcutaneous tissues are impregnated with derivatives of aniline from an indelible pencil. The accident of piercing the cutaneous surface with an indelible ink pencil and of breaking off in the tissue of bits of the ink substance is not rare. Abundant records1 of such accidents speak for this, as well as for the repeatedly similar course of the reaction to the substance. Intense inflammation and resulting necrosis and fluidification of the involved tissue are the invariable stages which lead to ulceration, extrusion of the foreign dyes via the exudate and ultimate but sluggish healing. Naturally, the amount and the depth of the impregnation and the degree of References 1. de Puoz, John: Schweiz, med. Wchnschr. 63:1124 ( (Nov. 4) ) 1933. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

MELANOMA CAUSED BY INDELIBLE PENCIL

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/melanoma-caused-by-indelible-pencil-7wEL703ogx
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1938 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1938.01480080134015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Aniline and its derivatives and coal tar, their natural mother substance, have demonstrated their ability to produce inflammatory and neoplastic reactions in the skin. In a special class in this category of cutaneous reactions are those in which the skin and adjacent subcutaneous tissues are impregnated with derivatives of aniline from an indelible pencil. The accident of piercing the cutaneous surface with an indelible ink pencil and of breaking off in the tissue of bits of the ink substance is not rare. Abundant records1 of such accidents speak for this, as well as for the repeatedly similar course of the reaction to the substance. Intense inflammation and resulting necrosis and fluidification of the involved tissue are the invariable stages which lead to ulceration, extrusion of the foreign dyes via the exudate and ultimate but sluggish healing. Naturally, the amount and the depth of the impregnation and the degree of References 1. de Puoz, John: Schweiz, med. Wchnschr. 63:1124 ( (Nov. 4) ) 1933.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1938

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month